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Big-Box Store Landlords See Signs Shoppers Still Spending

Some big-box store and mall owners in both national and Philadelphia commercial real estate markets are releasing sighs of relief: Consumers still are spending and could keep that up throughout the crucial holiday shopping season and into 2020, lifting any concerns of an immediate acceleration in store closings.

Peering into the earnings results of some the nation’s predominant big-box discounters like Target and TJ Maxx can offer a sense the economy and consumer confidence in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – will stay strong, at least for now.

That’s been a much-talked-about topic recently in U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings circles as investors awaited earnings reports they hoped would shed light on the current state of an industry evolving quickly to balance in-store and e-commerce sales as well as its brick-and-mortar footprint.

This CoStar Realty Information Inc. report from Jennifer Waters involving U.S. and Philadelphia commercial properties is being made through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

Store closings across the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – have been at a record pace, causing owners, investors and lenders to watch retail earnings reports closely to see if any slowing demand could mean more closings and empty store property on their hands.

Even with results that fell short of some of Wall Street’s expectations, retailers repeated the same song: the economy is still ticking away, and consumers still are in good shape. Of course, many of these retailers in national and Philadelphia commercial real estate properties remain focused on keeping their costs low, which can help lure shoppers into stores. The harder test is faced by the department stores that offer more expensive items and are reporting earnings results later this week.

But for the lower-cost sellers, the healthy results came despite the Commerce Department’s October sales report, which showed a reduction in spending tied mostly to vehicles and gasoline sales, two volatile segments. Skipping over those, spending rose, albeit at a speck of 0.1 percent, but analysts mostly have disregarded those factors as outliers.

Target, for example, exceeded earnings expectations with results that buttressed its strategy of providing consumers with unique items. The Minneapolis-based chain introduced new apparel brands, a proprietary grocery brand, and opened 25 mini Disney stores last month at competitive prices.

TJ Maxx, the parent of its namesake stores as well as Marshalls, Home Goods, and Home Sense in Canada, also reported robust results and plugged its forecasts. For TJ Maxx, for example, the wave of store closings has been a boon to the company’s business model of purchasing leftover inventory and selling it at reduced prices.

There are exceptions, such as J.C. Penney and Kohl’s, which are scrambling for ways to keep their brands relevant, according to analysts. While big-box and mall owners with national and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings continue to keep an eye on those retailers, they can rest assured that consumers are still opening wallets as job growth continues to keep unemployment at low levels. – By Jennifer Waters, CoStar Realty Information Inc.

For more information about Philly office space, Philly retail space, and Philly industrial space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

A Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, Wolf Commercial Real Estate provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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Lower Inflation Figures Reflect Slowing Rent Growth

Recently released October consumer inflation numbers indicate less upward pressure on prices throughout national and Philadelphia commercial real estate markets, largely driven by weaker growth in housing costs, including slowing rent growth. The weaker inflation report comes after the Federal Reserve has already cut interest rates three times this year, in part to boost inflation closer to its target.

The slowdown in rent growth reflected in these lower inflation figures in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – is consistent with the trend in CoStar data on apartment rents, which have decelerated to around 2.6 percent today from above 3 percent in recent quarters.

This CoStar Realty Information Inc. report from Robert Calhoun involving U.S. and Philadelphia commercial properties is being made through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ data, the consumer price index, which measures the price Americans pay for consumer goods and services, increased 1.8 percent in October compared to a year earlier. A meaningful increase in energy services and gasoline prices affecting U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings drove the slight uptick from the 1.7 percent increase seen in the previous month.

The core consumer price index, which excludes volatile food and energy prices and is a better measure of underlying inflation pressure, slipped to 2.3 percent year over year, down from 2.4 percent in September. The resultant decline in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – was largely driven by housing-related costs.

The shelter costs among national and Philadelphia commercial real estate properties account for roughly one-third of the consumer price index and nearly half of the core index. While government figures show rent for primary residences growing at 3.7 percent from a year ago, month-over-month rent growth decelerated to just 0.1 percent. This is the slowest growth in more than eight years.

Goods inflation, excluding food and energy, slowed somewhat in October as well. Apparel prices were the primary cause. While they are very noisy, the month-over-month decline of -1.8 percent represents the third-largest drop in apparel prices since at least 1947.

Prices for goods may see upward pressure going forward because of higher tariffs on imports from China and a recent decline in the foreign exchange value of the U.S. dollar. Continued strength in the labor market and wages concerning national and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings should allow retailers to pass on much of the expected price increases through to consumers.

Households in the U.S. spend three times as much on services as on goods. Despite slowing shelter costs, services inflation rose slightly in October to 3 percent. The cost of medical care services has been rising dramatically in recent months and now stands 5.1 percent higher than a year ago. Unemployment among healthcare practitioners and technicians is currently just 1.1 percent, which could be pushing up the cost of such services.

This report is not likely to change the central bank’s current stance on interest rates, at least for now. Although inflation is not trending in the direction the Fed would like, the Federal Open Market Committee indicated at its meeting in October that it intends to hold interest rates steady as it monitors incoming data. (NOTE: Robert Calhoun is a managing director and senior economist for CoStar Market Analytics in New York City.)

For more information about Philly office space, Philly retail space, and Philly industrial space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

A Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, Wolf Commercial Real Estate provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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Avoiding Exposure for Commercial Real Estate Developers

Avoiding Exposure for Commercial Real Estate Developers

Commercial real estate developers and owners of recently completed development projects should be aware of a few things that can be done after the ribbon cutting to prevent headaches later on, avoid exposure to potential penalties for failing to comply with certain development conditions, and possibly put some money back in the till. Attention should be paid to these three issues after a project is completed.

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OBTAIN AN AS-BUILT SURVEY OF YOUR PROJECT.

An as-built survey is a detailed land survey that includes exact locations of subsurface infrastructure such as pipes and foundations. Sometimes owners rely on contractor notes that have been scribbled on design plans in the field during construction to serve as an as-built. Incorporating these notes in a clean and accurate as-built survey is well worth the time and expense as it will save headaches trying to piece information together later.
An as-built survey should be prepared immediately after the project has been completed. A purchaser might also consider procuring an as-built if one is not available. Some might view this an unnecessary expense; however, consider the following:

1) what is actually built by the contractor in the field doesn’t always line up exactly with the engineering design plans;

2) preparing a clean survey to document as-built conditions immediately after construction eliminates the time consuming and often costly effort required to piece together the information at a later date; and

3) if, at a later date, you want to make improvements or put an addition on the property, having an accurate as-built survey of existing conditions shows exactly where everything is on your site and expedites the process.

As an example of how an accurate as-built survey can save time and money, consider a scenario in which an owner wishes to construct an addition to an existing building and tie a new sewer lateral into an existing underground sanitary sewer force main. The design plans for the addition are developed based on the original design plans for the main building rather than an as-built survey, because the owner never had an as-built survey completed after construction. The design plans for the addition referenced an ‘approximate’ location of the force main, as the ‘exact’ location was never documented. What if that force main was not in the location indicated
on the design plans? If not, it would require a lot of digging and an expensive subsurface utility investigation to locate the pipe to determine the exact location. This costly delay could be avoided if the owner invested in a complete and accurate as-built survey of the property immediately after construction, including the location of all underground infrastructure.

MAKE SURE YOUR NJDEP PERMITS (INCLUDING YOUR WETLANDS LOI) WERE RECORDED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK

Many landowners and commercial real estate developers understand the need to obtain permits from the NJDEP to make improvements to land in New Jersey. However, compliance with administrative permit conditions is sometimes overlooked. One of the conditions of all permits that are issued by the NJDEP under the Freshwater Wetlands Protection Act Rules (Rules), N.J.A.C. 7:7A, is that permits must be recorded with the Office of the County Clerk (or the Registrar of Deeds and Mortgages, if applicable) where the site is located. Permits must be recorded within 30 calendar days of receipt (for activities taking place in only one county) and within 90 calendar days of receipt (for activities within two or more counties). A copy of the recorded permit must be forwarded to the NJDEP. Recently, as of July 2019, NJDEP has also required that freshwater wetland delineations and verifications must also be recorded. As
stated in the Rules, within 90 calendar days after the NJDEP issues a wetland delineation or verification letter of interpretation on a privately owned lot, or on a publicly owned lot other than a right-of-way, the recipient of the delineation or verification shall submit certain information to the Office of the County Clerk or the registrar of deeds and mortgages in which the site is located, and shall send proof to the NJDEP that this information was recorded on the deed of each lot referenced in the delineation or verification letter of interpretation.

It is important that this condition is not overlooked, as the NJDEP has the authority to take enforcement action if permit conditions are not met. As stated in the Rules, any noncompliance with a permit constitutes a violation of the NJDEP rules and is grounds for enforcement action under N.J.A.C. 7:7A-22, which includes potential penalties and suspension and/or termination of a permit. In the case of a wetland delineation or verification letter of interpretation, termination of a permit may mean having to re-delineate the wetlands which can be expensive, time-consuming, and subject to a new interpretation.

CLOSE OUT YOUR ESCROW ACCOUNTS AND REQUEST RELEASE OF PERFORMANCE GUARANTEES

Under the Municipal Land Use Law, N.J.S.A. 40:55D-1 et seq. (MLUL), there is a specific process for closing out escrow accounts and requesting release of performance guarantees. For application review escrow accounts, once the approving authority has signed the subdivision plat or site plan, or for inspection escrow accounts, once the work is completed, the commercial real estate developers are to send a written notice by certificated mail to the chief financial officer (CFO) of the municipality, to the approving authority, and to the relevant municipal professionals. After such notice is transmitted to the appropriate parties, the professionals are to submit a final bill to the CFO of the municipality within 30 days, with a copy to the developer. The CFO of the municipality must render a written final accounting to the commercial real estate developer on the uses to which the deposit was put within 45 days of receipt of the final bills. Any balances remaining in the deposit or escrow account, with any interest, must be refunded to the developer along with the final accounting. See N.J.S.A. 40:55D-53.2.

For performance guarantees, upon substantial completion of all required street improvements (except for the top course) and appurtenant utility improvements, and the connection of same to the public system, the commercial real estate developers may submit a request by certified mail to the governing body to the attention of the municipal clerk, with a copy to the municipal engineer, for the municipal engineer to prepare a list of all uncompleted or unsatisfactory bonded improvements. That request should specify which of the bonded improvements have been completed or remain uncompleted in the opinion of the developer. In response to the request the municipal engineer is to inspect all bonded improvements and submit a detailed list and report, in writing, to the governing body, with a copy to the developer, within 45 days after receipt of the request. Simply put, depending on the outcome of the inspection, the performance guarantee may be either released or reduced by a specific amount, commensurate with the remaining work. If the municipal engineer fails to send or provide the list and report as requested within 45 days from receipt of the request, the commercial real estate developer may seek a court order compelling the engineer to provide the list and report within a set time and may also be reimbursed for the cost of applying to the court, including reasonable attorney’s fees. See N.J.S.A. 40:55D-53.

Following up on these three issues after a project is completed can save time, money and headaches. For more information on any of these topics, contact Rod Ritchie or Bob Baranowski for assistance.

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WCRE Exclusively Represents Samaritan Healthcare & Hospice Secure Their New Mount Laurel Headquarters Location

Redevelopment Continues in Region

Samaritan Healthcare & Hospice

WCRE is proud to have played a key role in representing Samaritan Healthcare & Hospice procure their new Headquarter location in Mount Laurel, New Jersey. Samaritan Healthcare & Hospice completed a long-term lease at the 27,600 square foot free standing office building located at 3906 Church Road in Mount Laurel, NJ. The property is positioned directly across from Lifetime Fitness and directly next to several other well-known community service occupiers, including Bancroft. 3906 Church Road provides immediate access to I-295 (Exit 36) and The New Jersey Turnpike providing for convenient access for their clients and employees.

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Samaritan plans to relocate their entire Marlton office where they currently occupy approximately 21,000 SF of office space for the last 20 plus years.

The new Mount Laurel facility will be a complete interior and exterior renovation bringing a fresh, new look to the building.

Samaritan will relocate its corporate office to the new location in the beginning of 2020, the year of Samaritan’s 40th anniversary. “It’s an exciting time for Samaritan. A new year, new expanded services, and a new home,” says Mary Ann Boccolini, President and CEO of Samaritan Healthcare & Hospice. “The expanded space in the new building will enable us to support our growing family of services and employee base that touches over 10,000 lives every year. This new space will support our growth in years to come as we provide more and more essential healthcare services across the healthcare continuum to more and more people in the south Jersey and surrounding communities.”

WCRE’s Managing Principal, Jason Wolf noted the complexity involved in matching the parties according to their needs. “This assignment showcases our ability to work with multiple parties to structure a long-term investment and redevelopment transaction that will provide excellent outcomes for everyone involved,” Wolf said.

This transaction adds to WCRE’s growing number of educational, non-profit and institutional transactions in the Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey region. This highly specialized sector is an area of strength and growth for WCRE.

The local ownership of 3906 Church Road was represented by Evan Zweben at Colliers International and Veritas Real Estate.

About WCRE

WCRE is a full-service commercial real estate brokerage and advisory firm specializing in office, retail, medical, industrial and investment properties in Southern New Jersey and the Philadelphia region. We provide a complete range of real estate services to commercial property owners, companies, banks, commercial loan servicers, and investors seeking the highest quality of service, proven expertise, and a total commitment to client-focused relationships. Through our intensive focus on our clients’ business goals, our commitment to the community, and our highly personal approach to client service, WCRE is creating a new culture and a higher standard. We go well beyond helping with property transactions and serve as a strategic partner invested in your long term growth and success.

Learn more about WCRE on Twitter & Instagram @WCRE1, and on Facebook at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, LLC. Visit our blog pages at  www.southjerseyofficespace.com,   www.southjerseyindustrialspace.comwww.southjerseymedicalspace.comwww.southjerseyretailspace.comwww.phillyofficespace.comwww.phillyindustrialspace.comwww.phillymedicalspace.com and  www.phillyretailspace.com.

 

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East and West Trade Deals Bring Sighs of Relief, for Now

Recession and trade talks recently have been in the same sentence, with political entrenchment a risk to sap growth through the rest of this year and next. In that case, new preliminary trade agreements between both the U.S. and China and U.K. and European Union offer seemingly good news for national and Philadelphia commercial real estate markets. However, while these two pre-deals are a relief on their face, neither appears completely satisfying, nor complete.

The U.S. agreement with China, announced late on Oct. 11 with details slow to leak, appears far from a done deal in relation to the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space. The faint sketch of the terms appears to focus on a phased agreement, where China would purchase more agricultural products from the U.S. and agree to new currency management standards.

This CoStar Realty Information Inc. report involving U.S. and Philadelphia commercial properties is being made through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

Meanwhile, across the pond, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson returned home to sell his Brexit deal to Parliament last weekend, and the initial response was hardly positive. Parliament is likely to remain in a frantic state as the deal appears to choose a much harsher Brexit than that agreed to by Johnson’s predecessor, Theresa May, and some favor further delay until a consensus can be reached.

With industrial production growth turning negative compared to a year prior, based on August data released last week, any further slowdown in trade is everyone’s problem; U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings already are peripherally dealing with the consequences.

China’s industrial production, while staying positive, has slowed dramatically as well with GDP growth falling to a 30-year low, according to figures announced this past week. The industrial real estate sector in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – is cooling in the face of these headwinds.

Overall, third quarter growth for national and Philadelphia commercial real estate properties should continue, but it faces plenty of crosscurrents. One major plus has been personal consumption, which remains elevated because of the tight labor market and despite a modestly weaker retail sales report this past week.

The second biggest boost is likely to be from government, though U.S. subsidies may not be enough to counteract the more significant drag from trade. Non-residential investment is a concern, with businesses confidence dropping severely recently amid uncertainty. All those factors portend a mixed message for office and retail, ultimately with their fate determined by whatever long-term clarity can be glimpsed as the economy settles into a slower growth path.

One noteworthy data point: Investment in residential housing among the varied national and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings has been muted since the financial crisis, but it looks on track to have a stellar second half of 2019. Housing starts surged in September according to data released last week, and a rise in homebuilder confidence means it is likely to stay near that level.

This is good for the economy but perhaps negative for multifamily investors, as lower rates and higher incomes are spurring home ownership. Note: Robert Calhoun is a managing director and senior economist and Matt Powers is associate director of market analytics for CoStar Market Analytics in New York City.

For more information about Philly office space, Philly retail space, and Philly industrial space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

A Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, Wolf Commercial Real Estate provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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HOME SWEET HOME FOR OFFICE DESIGN – RIGHT HERE AT COFCO

With many of us spending so much time at work, Office Design is changing. Office Design is beginning to look more like our homes. This article takes a look at how Office Design is changing.

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By Dean Molz, VP of Business Development, COFCO

Office DesignWe have seen a tremendous evolution in Office Design in the last 35 years. The freestanding “tank” desk with a typewriter stand was the standard at one point. In came the “cubicle” – a modular wall that provided privacy, and data connectivity. We’ve since seen the cubicle “farm” go by the wayside in favor of open office space. Corner Offices – well moved out of the corner, and the completely “open plan” with non-assigned seats came in vogue. Am I showing my age??

All interesting concepts, with a lot of buzz words.

So, what’s next? According to Jeff Pochepan of StrongProject, Inc., there’s no place like home – unless your office can recreate it. This is an interesting trend, of which you will see signs of at COFCO’s newly renovated Resource Center. It is called close-tohome design.

On average we spend 35% of our waking hours in the office. That’s a lot of time. Therefore, our clients are listening to the wants and needs of their workforce now more than ever. They are also paying attention to what recent graduates are looking for, given the recent influx of millennials in the workforce. This makes for good business, and is a time when we must compete to attract and retain top talent for future generations.

What is it? It’s the simple idea of making your office feel more like home – a place where you are relaxed, have no trouble putting in more hours and feel comfortable doing so. A place that creates a sense of community where you can collaborate with colleagues, work anywhere and in a variety of different types of spaces, based on what you need and want at the moment.

Office DesignThe institutional breakroom has turned into a café. A place where more intimate lighting, restaurant style comfort, and large café’ tables inspire casual conversation. A place to bond, share a meal, and where some of the best inspiration can happen. Maybe the happy hour can come to us, instead of going out to the corner restaurant.

The board room has turned into a living room of sorts. Where more comfortable couches make conversation feel more like friends having a get together, than doing business. This is a space where you may be encouraged to formulate ideas, before they become formal presentations. A place where you enjoy spending time, and can put your feet up.

The office space is more bright, open and collaborative. We are creating a sense of community where you can collaborate, see, talk and mingle with my colleagues. A place where meetings can be simple conversations in the hallway and ideas can come casually and without pretense; where decisions can be made and executed in a flash. It’s about fostering a culture of involvement. The saying “two heads are better than one” has real meaning.

Some common ideas include:

  • Game rooms
  • Yoga rooms (generally in the vicinity of onsite exercise facilities)
  • Food trucks
  • Showers
  • Living room style conversation pits
  • Quiet spaces designed like a study
  • Phone rooms
  • Outdoor spaces

Office DesignHow far should you go?? Your individual culture will determine the answer to that question. Here at COFCO, we have created a sense of relaxed professionalism. This is a perfect blend of comfort, design, collaboration and culture.

Creating this comfort is so intrinsic, that people relax when they enter their workplace. Just like you would when you get home from a long day. We put in longer hours than ever at work now. Technology has allowed us to work “anywhere, and at any time”. Why not create a space where people won’t HAVE TO go to work every day, they’ll WANT TOO.

Office Design - COFCO

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Grocery, Fitness Emerge as Retail Market Bright Spots

As e-commerce accelerates its sweeping disruption of the traditional U.S. retail industry throughout national and Philadelphia commercial real estate markets, store tenants that offer experiences and use smaller spaces are driving demand for brick-and-mortar leases, according to a CoStar analysis.

Tenants offering something to do rather than buy — think yoga studios, ax-throwing clubs and trampoline parks — are emerging as viable alternatives to big-box retailers in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly retail space, CoStar economists say in a new video (available by clicking here). Discount apparel stores, fitness concepts and grocers, the latter two being something consumers don’t always seek online, are the fastest-growing users.

This CoStar Realty Information Inc. report involving U.S. and Philadelphia commercial properties is being made available through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

Tenants, according to two CoStar market analysts, are helping to fill large blocks of space vacated by more traditional retailers.

“Landlords with empty big-box space are finding other creative approaches to replace traditional tenants,” said Abby Corbett, managing director and senior economist in CoStar’s Chicago office.

The rise of e-commerce throughout U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings has contributed to an overall cut in spending at physical retail stores by 7 percent and counting, Corbett said.

In addition to experiential users, retail landlords involved in national and Philadelphia commercial real estate properties also are finding success among smaller tenants. More than 50 percent of the leases signed in 2019 were for spaces smaller than 5,000 square feet, and 80 percent of all leasing activity in 2019 has taken place in spaces smaller than 25,000 square feet.

“While leasing activity has decelerated over the past year, tenants clearly remain focused on incorporating physical space in their retail strategies,” said Galina Alexeenko, managing director and senior economist in CoStar’s Atlanta office.

Despite the demand for these nontraditional tenants, overall retail demand is weakening. Over the past year, net absorption — the change in the supply of commercial space — totaled 30 million square feet, a record low. Just 10 million square feet of new retail space broke ground in the third quarter, adding up to a total of 67 million square feet of space in the national pipeline. – By Cara Smith-Tenta, CoStar Realty Information Inc.

For more information about Philly retail space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly retail space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly retail space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly retail space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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Philadelphia Job Growth Slows Heading Into 2020

With construction activity ramped up throughout the national and Philadelphia commercial real estate markets, and with Center City’s restaurants packed, most residents maintain a positive feeling about the current health of Philadelphia’s economy.

But the pace of job growth has also been disappointing in recent months, with total jobs in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – growing by 1.1 percent year-over-year as of August. This is well below the national pace and about half the rate of job growth achieved in Philadelphia just two years ago.

This CoStar Realty Information Inc. report involving U.S. and Philadelphia commercial properties is being made available through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

Store closures are hurting workers in the retail trade sector, which has lost 7,000 jobs over the past 12 months. Meanwhile, growth in the education and health services sector of U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings has slowed significantly, following the more than 2,500 layoffs tied to the closure of Hahnemann Hospital.

There are a few silver linings to the current labor market picture. The professional and business services sector among national and Philadelphia commercial real estate properties is growing at some of the fastest rates observed during the current economic expansion. This category is comprised of high paying subsectors such as information technology, legal services, accounting and scientific research and development.

Moreover, much of the current slowdown in aggregate job growth is happening for a good reason. With the local unemployment rate now below 4 percent in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space, it simply is becoming difficult for companies to find available candidates.

All and all, Philadelphia’s labor market is awash in mixed signals, as is the overall U.S. economy. With profits among most of the region’s largest publicly traded companies remaining near record highs, a recession over the next several quarters does not appear to be likely.

But local job growth is slowing while national and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings also are showing weakness in the manufacturing, agricultural and homebuilding industries. Election uncertainty could also be an increased drag on business investment in the quarters ahead.

All of this means that while recession signals are not imminent, Philadelphia’s economic outlook is less bullish heading into 2020 than it was heading into 2019. – By Adrian Ponsen, CoStar Realty Information Inc.

For more information about Philly office space, Philly retail space, and Philly industrial space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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Winter Weather and Its Impact On Your Business

Winter weather is unpredictable and can have a large impact on your business. While maintaining business operations is always at the forefront of your mind, it is important to consider employee safety as well. You should have policies and procedures in place before bad weather hits so that your company and employees are as prepared as possible.

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Driving in Winter Weather on Company Time

winter weatherA major concern regarding winter weather is employees who drive a company car or vehicle as part of their workday. All vehicles should be given a safety check by a mechanic before the bad weather hits, and they should also be equipped with emergency materials such as a snow scraper, blanket, first aid kit and
flashlight.

In addition, employees should be instructed to dress properly for the weather, including a hat, scarf and gloves, or have extra clothing on hand in case of a breakdown or accident. In order to protect your company against liability, any employees who may drive in bad weather on company time should be trained in safe, cautious driving techniques and what to do in case of an accident. Also consider employees who drive as part of their commute—it may be wise to educate them in cautious winter driving techniques to ensure their safety while driving to and from work.

Employee Pay During Winter Weather

Pay issues arise when weather forces your business to close for any length of time or prevents employees from making it to work even if your business remains open. For non-exempt (typically hourly) employees, you are only required to pay them for the hours they actually work. Thus, if your business opens late, closes early or closes for an entire day, you are not required to pay them for any time missed.

If an exempt (typically salaried) employee works any part of the day, you must pay them for a full day. Similarly, if the business is closed for a day or more but less than a full week, you need to pay exempt employees their normal salary if they worked any part of that week. You do not need to pay employees if business is closed for a full week. This applies whether your company uses a five-day or seven-day workweek. You may, however, require that they use available paid time off or vacation time, if available. If your business remains open but an exempt employee cannot come in due to weather conditions, this is a personal reason, and you do not need to pay them. One option to ease the loss of a business day or any missed productivity is to ask exempt employees to work from home if you are already paying them for the day. You may also consider offering a telecommuting option during inclement weather even if your business remains open so employees can avoid the dangers of driving in the extreme cold or snow.

Be Prepared for Winter Weather

Employees should be informed of your company policies related to inclement weather—safety, attendance and pay-related. You should have an established communication method to inform your employees of a business closing or delay. When bad weather is coming, address all your policies again, remind employees of communication channels to address attendance and plan for the worst potential outcome to ensure your company is prepared for the weather.

Brian Blaston
Commercial Lines – Manager
Hardenbergh Insurance Group
phone: 856.489.9100 x 139
fax: 856.673.5955
www.hig.net

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Who Owns the Fixtures at Lease Expiration

Who Owns the Fixtures at Lease ExpirationLet’s examine who owns the fixtures at lease expiration. In order to facilitate a smooth transition between commercial tenants, it is important for landlords to understand their rights regarding items attached to their property. Generally, a lease will govern these rights. However, if the lease is silent on the issue, articles annexed to the property deemed “fixtures” must stay with the property, while articles deemed “trade fixtures” may be removed by a vacating tenant.

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In New Jersey, a fixture is an object that “become[s] so related to particular real estate that an interest… arises under real estate law.” N.J.S.A. 12A:2A-309(1)(a). In contrast, an article may be considered to be a trade fixture if: (1) the article is annexed to the property for the purpose of aiding in the conduct of a trade or business exercised on the premises; and (2) the article is capable of removal from the premises without material injury thereto. Handler v. Horns, 2 N.J. 18, 24-25 (1949). As such, an important distinction between fixtures and trade fixtures is whether removal of the item will cause material injury to the premises. See e.g.
GMC v. City of Linden, 150 N.J. 522, 534 (1997). In applying this test, courts infer that if removal of an article would cause material injury to the premises, the parties must have intended for the article to remain beyond the lease term. Id.

A typical conflict involving this nuanced distinction may involve a vacating tenant removing an item from the leased premises under the assumption that it was (1) attached to the premises for the purpose of conducting a trade or business; and (2) capable of removal without material injury to the premises. A landlord may dispute one or more of these assumptions, arguing that the article was not used in the conduct of business (that it was in fact attached to improve the structure) or is not capable of removal without material injury to the premises.Over the years, vacating tenants have attempted to remove countless items from leased premises, including air conditioning systems, irrigation systems, bolted down light fixtures and even circuit breaker panels, by arguing these items were trade fixtures. See e.g. In re Jackson Tanker Corp., 69 B.R. 850 (Bankr. S.D.N.Y. 1987).

However, it isn’t difficult to imagine a hypothetical where the traditional landlord and tenant arguments are reversed – that is, where the tenant argues that the article must remain with the property and the landlord argues that the tenant is responsible for its removal. This unusual fact pattern may especially arise where the tenant’s business is specialized in nature, and where equipment is not easily removed from the premises.

For example, Landlord rents out space to Tenant, who plans on operating a restaurant. The lease does not specifically address what does and does not constitute a trade fixture. Tenant plans on installing a walk-in freezer and other specialized, complex systems. After several years of operating, Tenant declines to renew the
lease, closes, and vacates the premises. Tenant removes the furniture, appliances not fixed to the premises and other items it deems to be trade fixtures and leaves the walk-in freezer infrastructure. Tenant refuses to remove the walk-in freezer, arguing its removal will cause substantial damage to the premises. Unable to re-let the premises to a restaurant tenant, Landlord is left with a walk-in freezer occupying a substantial portion of the premises. It is important that during the lease negotiation, landlords think carefully about the business their prospective tenant is in, the kinds of equipment the tenant will install and what will happen to that equipment upon termination of the lease. This same thought process applies when landlords receive requests for alterations. In the above hypothetical, Landlord could have avoided being left with a walk-in freezer and a less than desirable space if it addressed the issue during negotiation of the lease. A discussion with prospective tenants concerning the specific kinds equipment the tenant will install is always a good idea, followed by specifications and drawings for approval. Landlords are wise to reduce these conversations to writing, and specifically address each party’s expectations regarding the disposition of specific equipment when the lease inevitably comes to an end. As always, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

The contents of this article are for informational purposes only and none of these materials is offered, nor should be construed, as legal advice or a legal opinion based on any specific facts or circumstances.

William F. Hanna, Esquire
Hyland Levin Shapiro LLP
hanna@hylandlevin.com
Hyland Levin Shapiro LLP
6000 Sagemore Drive, Suite 6301
Marlton, NJ 08053-3900
(p) 856.355.2900

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Landlord Issues from Tenant Bankruptcies

Landlord Issues for Tenant BankruptciesAfter a spring frenzy to negotiate rent deferrals, abatements and lease amendments, retailers and other commercial tenants are seeking, in droves, the protection of the bankruptcy courts to restructure financial obligations and shed leases for non-performing store locations. The brands are storied: J. Crew, Neiman Marcus, GNC, Ann Taylor, Lord & Taylor, Brooks Brothers, Modell’s. Shopping centers, malls, mixed use spaces – few commercial landlords are spared. With no sign of a slow-down, this article provides a refresher on your rights, as a commercial landlord, in commercial tenant bankruptcies.

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Commercial Tenant Bankruptcies 101: THE BASICS

• Ipso facto clauses in a lease, which trigger default or acceleration upon the filing of a bankruptcy case, are generally unenforceable under the Bankruptcy Code. Thus, you cannot terminate a lease or stop performing your obligations under the lease on account of the bankruptcy filing.

• The filing of a bankruptcy case triggers the automatic stay, which requires all actions to enforce the lease, evict the tenant or collect a debt (including unpaid rent) to cease. Unless you have a judgment to possess the subject premises, or the lease has otherwise expired by its terms, you must not continue to pursue collection or enforcement activities.

• A commercial debtor may assume a lease and assign it to a third party, in most circumstances without your consent, even if the lease requires the consent of the landlord to assignment.

• A commercial debtor may reject a lease based on its business judgment, and you have very few (virtually no) grounds on which to object to a lease rejection.

Commercial Tenant Bankruptcies 201: WHEN WILL I GET PAID AND HOW MUCH?

In pre-pandemic times, a commercial landlord could rely on provisions of the Bankruptcy Code that require bankrupt tenants to continue paying rent under the lease during the pendency of the case (post-petition rent). During the pandemic, however, debtor-tenants have drawn on the equitable powers of the bankruptcy courts to suspend the obligation to make post-petition rent payments. In such cases, you should consult with counsel early in the case to ensure that appropriate measures are taken to protect your rights to receive, or, at the very least, make a claim for post-petition rent.

Recovery of unpaid rent will depend on how the debtor treats the lease as well as the financial health of the bankruptcy estate. Tenants under assumed leases must cure all breaches under the lease, including to pay in full all unpaid pre-petition and post-petition rent and other charges, such as CAM, any damages incurred as a result of the breach of the lease. Depending on the terms of the lease, the cure costs may also include attorneys’ fees incurred in connection with a breach of the lease and the bankruptcy itself. The cure amounts must be paid at the time the lease is assumed by the debtor or its assignee.

Landlords under rejected leases, on the other hand, are entitled to a claim against the bankruptcy estate, which, depending on the financial health of the debtor, may be paid in full, in part or not at all. While unpaid postpetition rent constitutes an administrative (or dollar-for-dollar) claim against the estate, all other pre petition rent and damages caused by the rejection of the lease constitute unsecured (often, cents-on-the-dollar) claims, and will be paid pro rata with other unsecured creditors. Further, while rejection damages include the amount of rent remaining in the life of its lease, damages are statutorily capped at the greater of one year of rent or the rent for 15% of the remaining term of the lease, not to exceed three (3) years. Landlords who successfully mitigate their damages and re-let the premises may not be entitled to any claim if the rent received under the new lease is greater than or equal to the rent under the existing lease. Payments on unsecured claims are typically paid, if at all, after the debtor has confirmed a plan of reorganization.

Commercial Tenant Bankruptcies 301: DO I HAVE TO ACCEPT A RENT REDUCTION?

Bankruptcy affords the debtor tenant a unique opportunity to re-negotiate its leases. On one hand, the Bankruptcy Code prohibits the debtor from cherry picking which provisions of a lease it wants to assume and which provisions it would like to reject; instead, the Code requires the debtor to assume or reject the lease in its entirety. On the other hand, many debtor tenants leverage the specter of potential rejection to obtain significant rent concessions from landlords. Rent reduction negotiations often begin in the pre-bankruptcy period and continue in the early days of the case, with landlords being told that failure to negotiate will result in certain rejection.

You do not have to negotiate with the debtor tenant or accept a rent reduction, though doing so may increase the possibility of the assumption of your lease. Debtor tenants are more likely to reject leases:

• Not essential to the continued operation of the business,
• With above-market rent,
• In areas saturated with other debtor locations, or
• With low-performing stores.

If your lease falls outside of these categories, then the debtor may assume the lease even without obtaining a rent (or other) concession.

Commercial Tenant Bankruptcies THE BIG PICTURE

As soon as a tenant shows signs of financial weakness, consider actively pursuing remedies under the lease, including termination or eviction proceedings. If the lease has expired or you have already obtained a judgment for possession when your tenant has filed for bankruptcy, tear up this article! (after confirming with your attorney that the lease is, in fact, properly terminated).

If the lease has not expired or terminated at the time of filing, be sure to engage bankruptcy counsel to review the proceedings and protect your interests in the case. Bankruptcy counsel will object to any insufficient cure amount, file a proof of claim for your damages and review any plan of reorganization to advise you of your
anticipated recoveries. Even though retail bankruptcies have become commonplace, sound counsel will ensure
that your rights are protected and help you get paid.

Finally, engage competent real estate professionals, who can provide an accurate assessment of current market
rent and assist in finding a replacement tenant to satisfy and requirement that you mitigate your damages
after rejection/termination of the lease.

The contents of this article are for informational purposes only and none of these materials is offered, nor should be construed, as legal advice or a legal opinion based on any specific facts or circumstances.

 

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Midsize Tenants Dominate Demand for Industrial Space

E-commerce and last-mile logistics tenants in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – are fueling additional demand for expansion in the U.S. and spurring midsize space users to dominate the industrial market.

Midsize industrial tenants – those who occupy 50,000-sq.-ft. to 300,000-sq.-ft. boxes – are driving industrial demand in various segments of the national and Philadelphia commercial real estate market, according to a report from real estate services firm Avison Young in a recent issue of National Real Estate Investor magazine.

For example, between January 2017 to June 2019, tenants in Chicago signed 872 industrial leases totaling 97.3 million sq. ft., with an average size of 111,629 sq. ft. Tenants in Atlanta signed 320 industrial leases totaling 36.2 million sq. ft., with an average size of 113,243 sq. ft. Dallas tenants signed 490 leases totaling 52.5 million sq. ft., with an average size of 107,265 sq. ft. Tenants in Indianapolis signed 41 leases totaling 52.5 million sq. ft., with an average size of 146,341 sq. ft., according to Avison Young.

This CoStar Realty Information Inc. report involving U.S. and Philadelphia commercial properties is being made through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

“[Midsize users] do dominate the market,” says Brooks Staley, senior consultant with The CoStar Group, a research firm dealing with market metrics dealing with U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings. “There are a lot more users who are looking for space in that kind of sweet spot than those who are looking for big boxes.”

For example, in Indiana, demand for midsize industrial space is booming, but the supply is scarce. As of mid-June 2019, there were 12 speculative industrial buildings of 250,000 sq. ft. or less being developed in Central Indiana, totaling 2.1 million sq. ft. In the state’s southern submarket, there is, however, only one midsize space available, a 70,400-sq.-ft. property in Greenwood.

Florida’s industrial markets also are showing growth among midsize users. Orlando tenants signed 68 industrial leases totaling 7.3 million sq. ft., with an average deal size of 108,095 sq. ft. Tampa Bay tenants signed 53 industrial leases totaling 5.0 million sq. ft., with an average deal size of 94,333 sq. ft. Jacksonville tenants signed 61 leases totaling 7.0 million sq. ft., with an average deal size of 114,590 sq. ft.

The growth in e-commerce and the need for last-mile delivery throughout national and Philadelphia commercial real estate properties has only strengthened the demand for midsize industrial boxes. At the end of June 2019, pricing for these types of assets averaged $68.71 per sq. ft., with around $4.7 billion in sales volume, according to CoStar data. At the end of June 2018, prices averaged $59.08 per sq. ft., with $7.7 billion in sales volume. In June 2017, pricing in the sector was at $59.56 per sq. ft., with $7.3 billion in sales volume.

“You can see that there’s been a pretty steady acceleration of pricing at 300,000 square feet and below. The same goes for larger sizes as well,” says Staley. “Industrial is the hot property type to be in right now, and that makes sense because of the tailwinds we’re seeing from e-commerce, from how all sorts of retailers are looking at their supply chain. We’re going to see pricing boosts for both midsize and large boxes.”

But despite strong demand and rising prices for midsize industrial facilities, investment sales activity in in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – is decelerating. In June 2019, there were 639 deals closed in the sector. In June 2017 and 2018, there were 1,121 and 1,197 deals, respectively. Staley says this drop stems from investors choosing to invest in ground-up construction to dodge rising prices on existing properties.

“We’ve done analysis that shows a lot more players in the industrial space actually are turning to development rather than acquisition in order to make returns,” says Staley. “[Pricing has] gotten so frothy in the marketplace that players are backing off or they’re saying, ‘We can develop. We can scrape a site and develop something.’ That would be the best shot at getting good returns.”

The same story is happening for large industrial facilities, or boxes with more than 300,000 sq. ft. In June 2017, pricing among such national and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings reached $48.18 per sq. ft., with around $3.2 billion in sales volume. By June 2019, prices climbed to an average of $76.20 per sq. ft., but with around $3.9 billion in sales volume.

“We would expect at the moment, because of pricing trends among all size ranges, that price appreciation will maybe stagnate a little bit as deals begin to dry up,” says Staley. “People are little bit leery of overpaying this late cycle.” – By Sebastian Obando; CoStar Realty Information Inc.

For more information about Philly office space, Philly retail space, and Philly industrial space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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