fbpx
Building Successful Relationships

Monthly Archives: February 2018


What Port Development Means for Industrial Real Estate

Gateway Port Development

There was a special focus on how port-related issues are driving real estate development at last week’s Bisnow National Industrial and Logistics Summit Northeast held in New York. Bisnow’s Miriam Hall did a great report on the experts’ view of commercial real estate market trends. Beyond the supply and demand of the current market, there were a few longer-term trends and issues that recurred throughout the day.

It’s all about the trucks

Trucking is the key mode of transport for moving goods in and out of ports, and it is increasingly the link in the supply chain driving the nature of industrial real estate development. Depending on who you ask, there’s either a shortage or truckers or a terribly inefficient allocation of existing resources. Either way, it’s creating a growing burden on logistics: the average age of truck drivers is now is 57, costs are up as much as 35%, and the American Trucking Association ATA estimates there is a shortage of nearly 69,000 truckers.

ELDs

Another hot topic of discussion throughout the day was the state of the trucking industry and the effect of mandated Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs). ELDs bring the traditional DOT-required driver logs into the 21st century by automatically tracking hours of service. While the system could lead to greater safety, there are significant costs for initial investment, especially for smaller owner/operators. The new system also means that a few minutes delay here and there cannot be fudged as many acknowledge has been done in the past, making efficiency even more important.

Gateway Ports

Going forward, experts see the maritime industry coalescing around a limited number of “gateway” ports capable of providing the infrastructure and service needed to compete for container traffic. With an expanded Panama Canal and larger ships, channel depth and air draft are two of the most obvious attributes that will define gateway ports.

Equally important is what you do with cargo once it’s offloaded. Larger ships and fewer steamship lines create the risk that gateway ports will become choke points unless they can achieve the velocity needed to move goods quickly through the port. Many ports have established truck appointment systems, and ELD requirements are only putting greater pressure on scheduling. Facilities need to be configured to handle this volume, and having a sufficient number of Customs agents on hand when cargo is moving through is vital.

Site Selection

Low supply and high demand means that warehousing properties situated near ports are commanding a premium right now. Long-term, experts expect distribution points to move closer to markets as land become more scare at ports.

That need in part prompted the Port of Virginia to create inland intermodal facilities to which containers are transported by rail and barge for distribution. Not only does this solve the landside storage problem, it avoids the need for added truck traffic at the port. The future will likely bring strategic alliances between private developers and public ports (especially landlord ports) to solve these warehousing and transportation issues.

Site Design

The changing nature of logistics activity is driving changes in the physical configurations and attributes of warehousing as well:

  • E-commerce fulfillment centers require more parking (and more land) than traditional distribution facilities.
  • The configuration of dropyards will need to be more efficient to minimize ingating and outgating times.
  • Next-day delivery will drive more multistory warehouse/industrial uses in urban areas. These are expensive build, and older building stock may not have required clearances and engineering.
  • Expect to see vacant big box start to fill last-mile needs.

Technology

As with many industries, technology is affecting logistics in the present and not-too-distant-future:

  • Electric trucks: Can save 25 cents/mile, helping to offset ELD compliance costs and dampen effect of low supply.
  • Load-Matching Apps: Sometimes called Uber for trucks, linking truckers with loads to improve utilization of trucking resources. Two of the most prominent are Convoy and Transfix.
  • Blockchain: Encrypted transactions of products more attractive.
  • Drone delivery: FAA clearance could one day be a factor in site selection.

 

Anthony V. Mannino

Chief Operating Officer, Wolf Commercial Real Estate (WCRE)

Sr. Consultant, Triad Strategies
Board Member, PhilaPort

Greater Philadelphia Area Commercial Real Estate

Share

Energy Usage Benchmarking Disclosure Policies

Energy Usage Benchmarking

Let’s look at energy usage benchmarking mandates and disclosure policies for commercial real estate. Increasingly, states, counties and cities nationwide are continuing to implement enabling legislation that mandates energy usage benchmarking and disclosure for commercial real estate. Benchmarking is the process of measuring energy usage and comparing it to that of similar buildings in similar geographic locations.

According to the Institute for Market Transformation (IMT), the building sector (think: office buildings, schools, homes, etc.) accounts for about 40 percent of the country’s total energy usage, making it the largest consumer of energy in the country. The theory behind benchmarking and disclosure of the relevant energy usage data is that by measuring the consumption of energy, real estate owners can thereafter improve their buildings’ efficiency, reduce their energy usage, cut energy costs, minimize harmful emissions and make their properties more attractive to potential financers, buyers and tenants.

Download Printable Article (PDF)

ENERGY STAR:

To aid in energy efficiency efforts, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) created ENERGY STAR©, which allows building owners and operators to measure and record energy use data online, for free, using the Portfolio Manager system. Using the energy usage data inputted, Portfolio Manager assigns each building an efficiency rating on a scale of one to 100. A higher score reflects a building’s scoring better in efficiency that a set of similarly situated buildings. For instance, a score of 90 would mean that the building scores better than 90 percent of the buildings in the applicable data set; similarly, a building with a score of 30 would be only 30 percent better than similar buildings (or put another way, the 30 score would be 70 percent worse off efficiency-wise than its competitive set buildings). A building receiving a score of 75 or higher is eligible for an Energy Star designation and decal to be displayed in the lobby, demonstrating its commitment to energy efficiency and reduced consumption.

Currently, about 40 percent of total commercial building space nationwide utilizes the Portfolio Manager system
for measuring energy efficiency. This includes more than half of the Fortune 100 companies’ campuses, many
colleges and universities, professional sports arenas, healthcare organizations and more. The number of buildings utilizing Energy Star and Portfolio Manager is steadily rising as more cities, counties and states introduce required benchmarking and disclosure policies.

Using the Portfolio Manager, building owners and operators can track their properties’ energy and water performance, as well as their greenhouse gas emissions. With this information, they can compare their properties’ performance to other, similar properties, set efficiency goals, track improvement, design space to attempt to fit a specific efficiency profile, share performance results and verify a return on their invested energy dollar vis-à-vis energy efficiency. Studies have shown that just benchmarking consistently is likely to lead to a 6 to 9 percent reduction in consumption, which, if energy costs held steady, would result in cost savings.

Additional information can be found on the Energy Star website.

ENERGY DISCLOSURE POLICIES ENACTED:

To date, two states, two counties and 24 cities across the United States have enacted energy disclosure policies for commercial buildings. The adoption of such policies is rising as the environmental benefits and cost- saving opportunities they create become more evident. The data from benchmarking may also be, and is sometimes required to be, disclosed to the public or potential partners in transactions. “We believe that sharing this data can … drive the market to recognize and reward energy efficiency and create a continuous cycle of improvement and demand for high-performing buildings,” says the IMT. The theory of benchmarking and reporting is to attempt to level the playing field and operate as a quasi-miles per gallon equivalent to tenants when they are trying to understand the energy characteristics of similar building within a given submarket.

Implementing benchmarking and disclosure policies can increase market knowledge and competition, foster job
creation (via energy efficiency upgrades) and, of course, create energy and cost savings. The IMT conducted studies and published a fact sheet demonstrating the positive effects of benchmarking and disclosure. It found that when comparing similar properties with like features including rental rate, age and amenities, energy-efficient properties have seen a 10 percent better occupancy rate on average as compared to less efficient buildings. Similarly, properties that are more efficient demand approximately 9 percent higher rental premiums than less efficient properties. In certain areas of the country, properties that utilize benchmarking to inform their energy performance choices have enjoyed sales prices up to 25 percent higher than those of less efficient properties. Finally, an average 2.4 percent reduction in energy usage for buildings using benchmarking to set efficiency goals has equated to hundreds of thousands of dollars in savings each year for the buildings focusing on energy consumption reduction through efficiency.

The states, counties and cities that mandate commercial building energy benchmarking are:

States: California and Washington state

Counties: Cook County, Illinois, and Montgomery County, Maryland

Cities:

Atlanta; Austin; Berkeley; Boston; Boulder; Cambridge; Chicago; Denver; Evanston; Kansas City; Los Angeles;
Minneapolis; New York City; Orlando; Philadelphia; Pittsburgh; Portland, ME; Portland, OR; Salt Lake City; San
Francisco; Seattle; South Portland; St. Louis; and Washington, D.C.

View a Map Depicting This Information (PDF)

 

CALIFORNIA – Energy Usage Benchmarking

In 2015, California enacted Assembly Bill 802, which repealed a previous commercial building energy disclosure law and introduced new standards. Under the old law, owners of commercial properties had to disclose energy use data to prospective buyers, lessees and lenders. They had difficulty, however, obtaining tenants’ energy consumption records, as tenants had to grant prior authorization of such disclosure. Now, California utilities are required to keep benchmarking data on commercial properties in excess of 50,000 square feet that use their services. Upon request by a building owner or operator, the utility must disclose that data to the owner or operator. This streamlines the benchmarking and disclosure process and ensures greater access to information about energy usage. Furthermore, building owners and operators must now disclose the data publicly on an annual basis, rather than only to prospective partners in a transaction.

NEW YORK CITY – Energy Usage Benchmarking

In New York City, commercial buildings 50,000 square feet and larger must benchmark via the Portfolio Manager.
Starting on May 1, 2018, this requirement will extend to buildings of 25,000 square feet and larger. Furthermore,
the city will disclose the information gathered through benchmarking publicly on the internet each year. This will
allow prospective buyers, renters and lenders to understand better the energy performance of properties they
consider buying, renting or financing. It will also prevent building owners and operators from obscuring inefficient energy usage, while instead allowing them to make smart, effective changes to reduce energy costs and output. Benchmarking and public disclosure for a large number of commercial properties are intended to aid the city in reaching its goal of reducing emissions by 80 percent from 2005 levels by 2050. In addition, the city has recently passed Local Law 33, which requires beginning in 2020, that many buildings prominently post their

Energy Star scores along with a letter grade (e.g., A, B, C, etc.) in their lobby, much like restaurants do throughout the city for health inspection scores.

BENCHMARKING AND DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS IN SELECT CITIES

Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York City, Orlando, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, San Diego and San Francisco

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
If you have any questions about this Alert, please contact Brad A. Molotsky; any of the attorneys in our Real Estate Practice Group; any of the attorneys in our Energy, Environment and Resources Practice Group; or the attorney with whom you are regularly in contact.

Disclaimer: This Alert has been prepared and published for informational purposes only and is not offered, nor
should be construed, as legal advice. For more information, please see the firm’s full disclaimer.

Share

Success: A New Twist on an Old Story

I recently got an email from the Business Journal announcing open nominations for this year’s “40-Under-40” awards, a long-running tradition throughout the country. Not to be outdone, Forbes started its own Logan’s Run-inspired “30-Under-30” a few years ago (which is actually a list of 600 people; “math” is not one of the categories).

This celebration of the young might prompt some people over 40 to wonder whether opportunity has passed them by or is still on the road ahead, especially as the workforce is aging and downsizing prompts more mid-life career changes.

They might draw inspiration from a story I read a while back about a guy who didn’t get his big break until 45 – at a time when average male life expectancy was only 66. When he got the job, it wasn’t clear whether it would turn out to be professional exile or the opportunity of a lifetime.

He had been an athlete in college, frequently injured for three of his four playing years. He considered a career in law, but dropped out of law school. At one time he had even thought about being a priest – another pursuit he abandoned.

He toiled in the shadows of his chosen profession for years, achieving some noteworthy successes but never on the stage or at the level he felt he was truly capable of. For years he harbored frustration watching peers advance, often suspecting that his lack of opportunity was a product of prejudice. When job offers did present themselves, he could be conflicted and maddeningly indecisive.

These may not sound like the traits we usually associate with success, but the guy made the most of his big break, to say the least. In less than a decade, his name was permanently enshrined in American culture as synonymous with achievement and excellence. Richard Nixon even considered him as a Vice Presidential candidate (turns out he was a Democrat). As recently as last week, a million or so people – many born decades after his death – gathered a few blocks from my house to catch a glimpse of a trophy with his name on it. And to drink. Well, mostly to drink.

Perhaps I took a few editorial liberties in reciting a tale that usually begins with “Winning isn’t everything, but it’s the only thing.” The legend of Vince Lombardi often recalls the passion, drive, charisma, and discipline that led to unprecedented victory. But the complete story is a reminder that the path to greatness isn’t always a tidy or linear fairy tale; our heroes are more complex than we remember. It’s also a reminder that even in those moments when it might feel like we don’t have what it takes, or opportunity has passed us by, anything is possible.

Share

CRE Pricing Trends Continue to Hold Despite Transaction Slowdown

Healthy economic growth combined with steady demand and favorable interest rates provided a backdrop for continued growth in CRE pricing through the final quarter and the full year of 2017, according to the latest release of CoStar Commercial Repeat Sale Indices (CCRSI) data.

The equal-weighted U.S. Composite Index extended its streak of stronger growth with a 14.7 percent increase for 2017 and a 0.7 percent gain for the fourth quarter as the scope of the pricing recovery broadened across the full size and quality spectrum of the nation’s commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space. The value-weighted U.S. Composite Index rose 5.7 percent and 0.8 percent, respectively, during the same periods.

This CoStar report on the national pricing trends in the commercial real estate market is being offered through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

All the major commercial property-type indices in the U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate markets, including land and hospitality, posted gains in 2017 and ended the year on a positive note, marking the sixth consecutive year of pricing recovery.

Reflecting the healthy appetite for logistics properties rate among national and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, the Industrial index increased 17.7 percent, well ahead of the 9.9 percent pace set over the previous two years as industrial vacancy hit the lowest point of the cycle in 2017 despite a record year for new logistics construction.

The Prime Multifamily Metros Index also increased by a slower 4.2 percent in 2017, suggesting weaker growth in higher-value apartment properties in primary markets. Rising deliveries and already-elevated pricing contributed to a slower rate of multifamily price growth last year in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space. While a slowing from the prior period in 2015 and 2016, the overall U.S. Multifamily index rose by a still-robust 8.5 percent in 2017.

The rate of growth decelerated in the prime market indices and in some property segments among U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings ticking and the prime markets indices within each property sector dominated by the larger core coastal metros, generally advanced more slowly than the broader property-type indices in 2017, reflecting heightened growth at the lower end of the market.

Despite a high-profile wave of store closures and retailer bankruptcies that have pressured comparable-store sales, the U.S. Retail Index posted a 10 percent gain over the year. Store chains targeting less-productive locations for closure as demand for stronger locations remained robust. For more information about Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need — a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

Share

New Jersey Marijuana Reform Presents Commercial Real Estate Opportunities

New Jersey Marijuana Reform

New Jersey Marijuana Reform

Let’s look at New Jersey Marijuana Reform and Commercial Real Estate. Governor Phil Murphy campaigned on a pledge to fully legalize marijuana in New Jersey. On January 23, 2018 he signed an Executive Order directing a complete review of New Jersey’s existing medical marijuana program within 60 days, which sets the stage for legalizing recreational marijuana. Presently, only medical marijuana is legal under a New Jersey law enacted in January 2010. Likely marijuana reform presents unique real estate investment opportunities and will probably increase the demand for commercial and industrial real estate. However, there are significant risks that must be carefully considered before making any investment decisions, including criminal and civil liability (including property seizure) if federal laws are enforced, and a limited number of potential lenders and buyers.

Download Printable Article (PDF) >>>

Opportunities Associated with New Jersey Marijuana Reform

New Jersey Marijuana Reform presents a unique opportunity to be capitalized upon by risk tolerant investors willing to invest in real estate and benefit from the cannabis trend. Vacancy rates may decline based on the experience in other states following marijuana legalization and expansion, where cannabis suitable commercial real estate became hot commodities.

For example, in four states with legalized recreational cannabis (i.e. California, Colorado, Oregon and Washington), industrial real estate prices surged. In some Denver neighborhoods, the average asking lease price for warehouse space reportedly jumped by more than 50 percent from 2010 to 2015. Industrial space has been in high demand due to both marijuana growers and manufacturers seeking industrial warehouses to cultivate and process their product. Commercial real estate prices have also experienced double digit annual increases in some markets.

Risks Associated with New Jersey Marijuana Reform

The federal government does not recognize a legitimate medical use of cannabis and can impose criminal or civil liability under the Controlled Substances Act. Marijuana is currently classified as a Schedule I drug, which puts it
under the same category as heroin, cocaine, peyote, meth and fentanyl. It is currently illegal under federal law
to lease or rent real estate for the purpose of manufacturing or distributing any controlled substance. However,
the Department of Justice can direct the enforcement of these laws differently between administrations, as the
Obama Administration issued guidance discouraging the enforcement of federal marijuana laws in states where it had been legalized. United States Attorney General Jeff Sessions has long been strongly opposed to the legalization of marijuana and there is a fear of federal enforcement among owners, developers and lenders as long as the federal and state positions remain at odds. It is tough to make long term real estate investments without clarity predicated on the assumption that the federal government will not enforce its own laws.

Banks traditionally answer to federal regulators and risk losing their licenses by dealing with marijuana businesses. Federal banking laws also prevent banks from lending to or accepting deposits from illegal businesses. The federal government is also allowed to seize property. Thus, obtaining financing from traditional sources and collecting rents is difficult. Borrowing costs will therefore likely be higher than a typical real estate transaction, and tenants may be limited to properties that are owned free and clear of traditional financing.

Therefore, many companies that get into the marijuana business try to buy and control their own real estate. If the state approves expansion, it will probably issue licenses allowing business to legally sell recreational marijuana in designated places, and businesses must find a local jurisdiction that will allow them to operate.

Towns will need to change their zoning ordinances to allow for such uses.

What Does This Means for Commercial Real Estate Investors?

Higher risks will likely translate into higher rents for commercial and industrial landlords based on anecdotal evidence seen in California, Colorado, Oregon, Washington and other states that have permissible marijuana laws. Developers, landlords and investors with a suitable risk tolerance should closely follow the state’s progress in introducing and passing legislation to accomplish Governor Murphy’s goals and evaluate potential opportunities and risks. They should also monitor subsequent municipal efforts to accommodate such uses by amending their zoning ordinances, and work to identify potential opportunities in suitable locations.

The contents of this article are for informational purposes only and none of these materials offered are, nor should be construed as, investment advice, legal advice or a legal opinion based on any specific facts or circumstances.

kenneth-morgan

 

Share

When Should You Repave a Parking Lot

when should you repave a parking lotWhen should you repave a parking lot. Let’s look at indications that you should repave a parking lot. Are you looking at your parking lot wondering how you are going to fix the damage? How you are going to make it more appealing? Are you trying to decide if you can wait to have your lot repaved and/or touched up? This article will help you better understand your parking lot.

Your parking lot is the first impression of your business. There are several ways to enhance the beauty of your lot and to ensure any potential liabilities are
addressed in a timely manner.

Download: When should you repave a parking lot (PDF) >>>

When Should You Repave a Parking Lot

Let’s begin with the basics- when your lot is initially paved you can expect the lifespan to be approximately 15-20 years. Over time nature, gasoline, oil, and other products of the like will break down components of the asphalt. As soon as you notice cracking in your lot, our best advice is to have it filled.

This will prevent further damage and costly repairs. See the table above (Good Pavement) for examples of cracks that should be filled. Cracks within the pavement that are ¼” or greater should be filled. This process consists of injecting the crack with a rubberized material that will ensure the pavement does not continue to expand and contract. If cracks are ignored and not filled, you run the risk of your parking lot alligatoring. Alligatoring happens when cracks continue to spread throughout the entire lot- at which point you would need to have an overlay done or complete repave. An overlay consists of applying a new layer of asphalt over the existing asphalt surface. The thickness of an overlay should range from 1.5” to 2”. If your parking lot needs to be graded, or if the grades need to be changed, then the project will require milling. Milling is the process by which a machine is used to plane the pavement surface to an appropriate depth before it is covered with the new layer. Once the milling is finished and the overlay is complete, the customer is left with a brand new surface, ready for pavement
striping.

Parking lots should be sealcoated every 2 years. Sealcoating does three things for your parking lot: it protects it, beautifies it and ultimately saves you money. Sealcoating gives your lot a sleek black finish, which will enhance the appearance of your property.

Share

Growth Expected Throughout National Office Space Market in 2018

The U.S. office market continued to benefit from strong fundamentals going into 2018, despite continued deceleration in net absorption, occupancy, and rental rate growth.

With robust corporate profits and continued office-use job growth, that trend is expected to hold through the year as the recently approved tax cuts and expected gradual increases in interest rates make the nation’s commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – an attractive place for investors to park capital and get cash flow.

“You’re going to like GDP growth over the next few months,” CoStar Portfolio Strategy’s Hans Nordby said during CoStar’s year-end 2017 State of the U.S. Office Market report, co-presented with managing consultant Paul Leonard. “Corporate profit growth is a good story, and if you already think it’s strong, look underneath the hood. It’s even better.”

This CoStar report on the national office space market is being offered through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

The improved profit growth outlook for the services sector and other industries in the U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate markets that drive office demand, along with expected higher GDP growth projected at a very strong 2.5% to 3% in the next few months, should help office job growth hold steady at strong levels for the next few month, Nordby said.

The vacancy rate among national and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings held steady at 10.1% at the end of the fourth quarter 2017, unchanged from the same period a year prior, despite a large amount of new supply and a 20% decline in office net absorption to 65 million square feet for 2017.

Meanwhile, the total amount of office property acquired by investors declined about 15% in 2017 from the prior year, largely due to a sharp drop in office trades in New York City and the rest of the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space.

Despite the declining sales volume, average prices in primary markets continued to rise, prompting investors to fan out into secondary markets such as suburban Phoenix, where Transwestern Investment Group and JDM Partners acquired Marina Heights, State Farm’s office campus in Tempe, AZ, for $930 million at $459 per square foot.

Leonard, however, sees the national office vacancy rate within both U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings ticking up beginning this year through 2020 as the expected new supply of space finally begins to outpace demand.

For more information about Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need — a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

Share

Share

Share