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Do You Need A Corporate Move Management Company

Move Management CompanySelecting a move management company that’s right for your business is critical for an office relocation and/or expanding business. Today, companies are so focused on moving into their new space they rarely look at their old or existing space and all the costs associated with it. Moving an office can be a huge undertaking, and move management often despises the thought of relocation due to the disruption and disorganization that often follows. In order to move an office successfully without unnecessary disruption to the daily flow of business, business owners and management should consider hiring a move management company.

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Too often companies don’t have the manpower to dedicate to manage their office relocation. And they often don’t have the time to evaluate the benefits of a move management company. Move management companies are professionals who specialize in office relocation and expansion – and these experts know how to make the process flow smoothly. They understand the process of moving in great detail, and they are able to organize the process effectively, and manage details, budgets, timelines, and people.

Selecting a move management company that’s right for you is critical for an office relocation and/or expanding business. You’ll want to select a company who has expertise in relocation and project management, outstanding planning services, and highly skilled team members to meet the client’s ever changing needs. These experts will work with the client to determine what the office already has in place and what is needed in the new location. They will also implement the plans for specific designs and layout within your new office and set up the layout for your new location with relative ease. They will also handle all of the incidentals that often get put off or forgotten until after the move is complete.

Benefits of Hiring a Move Management Company

• Industry experts who can work with architecture/design firms and construction companies when needed
• Project planners who manage everything for you
• Time savings by avoiding unnecessary delays
• Cost savings
• Flexibility
• Employee satisfaction and productivity

KEEP IN MIND YOUR BOTTOM LINE
Before you decide to tackle your relocation, keep in mind your bottom line. This is the most important reason why you would want to hire a professional move management expert. You will save time and money in the long run which is always good for business.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Shawn O’Neil at 609-744-4112 or
Paul Sipera at 609-760-8312

ABOUT ARGOSY MANAGEMENT GROUP, LLC
Argosy Management Group (AMG) is a leader in office relocation and logistics project/move management. AMG services companies throughout the U.S. and worldwide. AMG delivers a wide range of comprehensive services: move management and transition planning, space planning and furniture needs, office and industrial relocation and liquidation, storage solutions and asset management, furniture disassembly and installation, and I.T./data center relocation.

visit www.argosymg.com

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New Census Figures Show Rise in College Educated Renters in Philly

Just before the start of 2020, the U.S. Census Bureau released a treasure trove of its most recent demographic data from 2018.

While the census’ data releases are slightly dated, the bureau still provides far and away the most granular insights available on changes in long-term demographic trends that offer a view of the national and Philadelphia commercial real estate markets.

For the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly retail space – one of the most important takeaways from the recent release was the continued surge in Philadelphia’s population of college-educated renters.

This CoStar Realty Information Inc. report involving U.S. and Philadelphia commercial properties is being made available through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

The year-end tally of overall renter households in Philadelphia County wasn’t particularly noteworthy. At 287,500, the figure was almost unchanged compared to 2013 levels. (See Chart “New Households Moving into Philadelphia County”)

But the slow-growing headline masks dramatic changes in the demographic makeup of Philadelphia’s renter population. With rents having risen for 10 years straight, low income renters are being priced out of Philadelphia at an alarming rate.

The number of renter households without a college degree declined by almost 20,000, or 13 percent over the past five years, more than 10 times the national rate of decline in this cohort. Conversely, the number of renter households with bachelor’s or graduate degrees jumped to 97,000 in 2018, an acceleration over the 5.4 percent annual growth the figure has averaged during the past five years. (See Chart “Renter Households With Bachelors Degrees or Higher”)

In line with these shifts, Philadelphia’s share of renter households earning over $75,000 has now doubled from 10 percent in 2010 to 21 percent in 2018, with most of the gains accruing during the second half of the decade. (See Chart “Percentage of Renter Households Earning $75K+”)

Why is Philly experiencing such rapid growth in high income renters? Increasing affordability barriers to homeownership (which will be covered in a future Costar Research update) are keeping more high-income residents living near U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings in the renter pool well into their 30s.

However, even greater affordability challenges in nearby New York and Washington, D.C., are sending residents to be closer to national and Philadelphia commercial real estate properties. As housing costs have skyrocketed in those locations during recent years, the number of college-educated migrants arriving in Philadelphia annually has grown by more than 50 percent since 2012.

This influx has been offset by Philadelphia’s continued losses in low- and middle-income renters. Census data suggests that in many cases, these renters are moving to some of the lowest-cost corners of the Philadelphia metropolitan statistical area, including Delaware County, Pennsylvania, and New Castle County, Delaware, which both saw their tallies of non-college educated renters rise by more than 4,000 over the past five years. However, others continue to leave national and Philadelphia commercial real estate properties seeking the mix of lower housing costs and better blue-collar employment prospects offered in the southern U.S. (See Chart “Total Renter Households”)

The overarching takeaway from the 2018 census release is that while Philadelphia’s renter population is growing more slowly than it was five years ago, it continues to gentrify at a rapid pace – By Adrian Ponsen, CoStar Realty Information Inc.

For more information about Philly retail space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly retail space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly retail space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly retail space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

 

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Job Growth, Consumer Spending Bode Well for CRE in 2020

The longest economic expansion since World War II in the national and Philadelphia commercial real estate markets shows indications of staying solid in 2020, extending the record bull run for U.S. commercial real estate despite some risks that could eventually move the country toward a recession, according to CoStar economists.

Trade wars and a slowdown in the U.S. manufacturing sector as well as around the globe last year roiled equity markets and rattled businesses in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly retail space, CoStar economists say in the “2019 Year in Review of the U.S. Economy” video (available by clicking here). This robust job growth has, the CoStar experts said, extended the spending power of American consumers, the heart of the nation’s economic engine.

This CoStar Realty Information Inc. report involving U.S. and Philadelphia commercial properties is being made available through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

“Our growing economy still bodes well for demand for commercial and multifamily real estate,” said Christine Cooper, managing director and senior economist from CoStar’s Los Angeles office. “Expanding payrolls will continue to fuel demand for office space, while rising incomes and consumption will boost demand in industrial and retail sectors. As job growth continues, consumers appear quite optimistic and unconcerned by the trade war and any economic slowdown abroad.”

Trade tensions caused markets dominated by U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings to swoon, resulting in distress and uncertainty for businesses dealing with disruptions to their supply chains and higher costs. That made firms cautious in their plans for expansion and private business investment, which has been slowing since mid-2018, said Galina Alexeenko, managing director and senior economist from CoStar’s Atlanta office.

“The business sector’s mood soured in 2019 as uncertainty reigned, costs rose, profit margins compressed and earnings growth slowed,” Alexeenko said. “Falling exports and the pullback in business investment have been a drag on economic growth.”

Migration of workers from the Northeast and Midwest – as well as throughout national and Philadelphia commercial real estate properties as well – continued to bolster surprising strength in labor markets, with job growth fueling real estate demand in the South and U.S. West, said Alexeenko. The Federal Reserve Bank faced rising trade uncertainties, slowing inflation and a global economic slowdown, the analysts said in the video.

“Going forward into this new decade, we expect economic growth to slow somewhat as the labor market cools, consumer spending loses some momentum and persistent global and trade policy headwinds weigh on business sentiment and investment,” Cooper said. – By Randy L. Drummer, CoStar Realty Information Inc.

For more information about Philly retail space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly retail space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly retail space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly retail space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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2019 U.S. Office Investment, Leasing Shatters Records

Demand for U.S. offices throughout national and Philadelphia commercial real estate markets set a post-recession record in 2019 as companies and real estate investors set aside concerns about a slowing global economy and snapped up workspace.

The average U.S. office vacancy rate matched a post-recession low of 9.7 percent and office sales and leasing set new records in 2019 in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly retail space, CoStar economists say in the “2019 Year in Review of the U.S. Office Market” video (available by clicking here). This should result, they say, in strong demand and performance through at least the middle of this year as technology companies like retailer Amazon and iPhone maker Apple move into new offices.

This CoStar Realty Information Inc. report involving U.S. and Philadelphia commercial properties is being made available through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

Led by about 8 million square feet taken by shared-office provider WeWork, total signed leases among U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings increased to a record 360 million square feet in 2019, and the total could rise by another 100 million square feet as CoStar researchers wrap up data collection for the year, said John Affleck, CoStar’s vice president of market analytics. WeWork is expected to scale back in 2020 after it scrapped an initial public offering and replaced its CEO in 2019.

About 160 million square feet of office space is under construction, roughly 2 percent of the nation’s total office supply, with Austin, Texas; Nashville, Tennessee; and San Jose in California logging the most building activity. Expanding tech firms such as Salesforce and Pinterest have snapped up space for future growth, signing leases for national and Philadelphia commercial real estate properties even before buildings receive development approval, said Mike Roessle, director of U.S. office analytics for CoStar Group.

“It’s surprising that large tenants are finding available space in such a low-vacancy rate environment,” Roessle added.

While average rent growth decreased in 2019, it ended the year at an average 1.8 percent. CoStar expects those trends to continue in 2020, forecasting 1 percent average annual rent growth from this year through 2024, Roessle said.

Despite rising concern about the possibility of a global recession, investors shelled out more than $130 billion to buy buildings last year, a figure that could approach $150 billion as CoStar’s researchers finish collecting deal information. That would be the highest total since 2007, the peak of the previous real estate boom.

Office investment in New York City was down significantly while sales in Seattle, San Francisco and other tech-focused markets increased last year, Affleck said. – By Randy L. Drummer, CoStar Realty Information Inc.

For more information about Philly retail space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly retail space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly retail space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly retail space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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Winter Weather Liabilities

Winter Weather LiabilitiesLet’s explore some winter weather liabilities. The winter months bring more than just cold weather and shorter days; they bring the possibility for winter weather and storms that may result in a snow and ice-covered landscape. While it may be a winter wonderland for some, as a property manager, snow and ice buildup means a hazard with the potential for costly liability.

If you deal with either commercial or residential property, you are responsible for the side effects of winter. In legal terms, snow and ice are the same as any other hazard presented on a property, and just like any other hazard, property managers can be held liable if they cause injury. To avoid litigation resulting from winter injuries, it is important that you are vigilant in your snow and ice removal efforts.

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RECOGNIZING AND PREVENTING HAZARDS

Winter brings a variety of hazards that you need to prepare for; slips and falls are by far the most common injury associated with winter weather conditions. Diligent snow and ice removal can go far in keeping walkways and parking lots safe. Remove snow quickly after snowfalls, and salt regularly to keep ice from building up.

Not all winter hazards are under foot, however, icicles, along with other accumulations of frozen or heavy snow above walkways and building entrances, can cause serious injury if they fall on those below. Remove icicles and other buildup as soon as possible. If it still appears to present a hazard, consider rerouting foot traffic around the area.

Performing preventative maintenance in the summer and fall can also keep you prepared for winter storms. Make sure eaves are properly installed, and check that downspouts are aimed away from walkways. If eaves leak or downspouts direct water onto walkways, snow that melts in the heat of the day has the potential to freeze and create a hazard with cooler nighttime temperatures.

TRANSFERRING RESPONSIBILITIES TO TENANTS

For smaller residential rentals, such as single family homes or duplexes, the responsibility for snow and ice removal is commonly accepted by the tenant. To make sure responsibility is clearly established in this situation, the lease should include a provision citing the tenants as responsible for any snow and ice removal. This section of the lease should also establish how long after a snowfall the tenant has to clear public areas such as sidewalks, as most municipalities have laws requiring prompt snow removal. It is important to be as specific as possible to avoid any unnecessary liability or disputes after heavy storms.

CONTRACTING SNOW REMOVAL

Based on the size and number of properties you manage and the average snowfall in your area, you may be inclined to contract out snow removal to an independent company. While this can save you the time and costs associated with managing snow removal yourself, it is important that you choose wisely to avoid complicating matters.

First, make sure the contractor has sufficient resources to meet your demands. It is important that they can be onsite quickly after, or even during, a snowfall to make sure walkways and parking areas are cleared. It is also important that they have the equipment and manpower to finish the task quickly to reduce any disruption to tenants’ lives or businesses.

Second, make sure the company you hire carries the proper insurance, covering both its operations and its employees. The last thing you want is to end up being liable for a worker’s injury when liability for injury is the very thing you were trying to avoid. Also, much like the lease agreement with a residential tenant, it is important to specify the conditions and time constraints for removal in writing. When contracting any type of service, it is essential to have a written contract that will guarantee you receive the services you pay for.

It should be noted that hiring a removal service does not absolve you of liability. If the company you hire provides poor service, or simple does not show up at all, you are still the party responsible for any injury resulting from a winter hazard. Make sure to pick a reputable company that you can trust to do a good job, and always have a plan of action for removal if they are unable to complete the work as quickly or effectively as you require.

For additional questions on your risks and exposures, or on appropriate coverages to protect you from liability or costly disputes, contact Hardenbergh Insurance Group today.

For more information, contact:

winter-weather-liabilitiesBrian Blaston
Commercial Lines – Manager
Hardenbergh Insurance Group
phone: 856.489.9100 x 139
fax: 856.673.5955
www.hig.net

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Mixed Messages Cloud the View Toward Clarity in Economic Policy

Analysts had hoped to get some clarity in the past week on both monetary policy and fiscal policy fronts. Instead, with all the recent announcements, reversals, and delays related to trade deals, there were many moving parts with which to contend.

On the monetary policy side, the Fed formalized its intent to keep interest rates in the U.S. economy – along with national and Philadelphia commercial real estate markets – steady for the foreseeable future. This was largely expected, though some comments by Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell suggested an interesting shift in the committee’s mindset over the previous year.

In his most recent press conference, Powell said “even though we’re at 3.5 percent unemployment, there’s actually more slack out there.” And then later, “I like to say the labor market is strong. I don’t really want to say that it’s tight.”

This CoStar Realty Information Inc. report from Robert Calhoun and Matt Powers involving economic issues as they relate to U.S. and Philadelphia commercial properties is being made through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

The suggestion by a Fed chairman that 3.5 percent unemployment affecting, among other segments of the economy, the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – doesn’t represent maximum employment would have seemed crazy even just three or four years ago and would have been met with incredulity.

We know that to be true because in June of 2016, then-Fed Governor Jerome Powell said, “The unemployment rate has fallen from 10 percent to 5 percent, close to the level that many observers associate with full employment.”

We should congratulate the Fed for being humble about its ability to estimate something unobservable like full employment. You can’t see full employment, but you will know it by its fruits. Those fruits are rising wages and rising inflation.

November’s consumer price index showed little risk of an undue rise in inflation any time soon. While the monthly increase in the core consumer price index (excluding food and energy) was double that of October, the year-over-year increase remained at 2.3.

The Fed bases its inflation target on a measure known as personal consumption expenditure, which tends to run lower than the index due to differing weights. As the core index was most recently 73 basis points above core expenditure, this week’s inflation data suggests that the Fed should continue struggling to meet its inflation target and its resultant effects on U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings.

As for future wage growth, that depends on continued hiring. Earlier in the week, we got more information on the health of the labor market in the form of the National Federation of Independent Business’s survey. Widespread small business sentiment – as well as the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – appears to have rebounded from uncertainty-driven declines over the last few months.

Plans to increase both capital spending and hiring rebounded strongly, reversing declines that were looking worrisome. The reason for the improvement appears to be better November sales, with more firms reporting an increase in sales than a decline.

Firms were already seeing improvements even before this week’s improved clarity on the outlook. The survey questions about labor tightness and wage growth involving national and Philadelphia commercial real estate properties showed meaningful upticks as well. Given such low recent levels in sentiment across the board, we have been expecting a slowing in growth. While this is still likely, as seen in Friday’s weaker retail sales figure, the most recent small business report says maybe we’ve found a floor.

Last week also provided needed clarity from the fiscal side after weeks of conflicting reports. On Tuesday, the Democrats and Republicans came to an agreement on revamped language for a U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade deal. On Thursday, the U.S. and China reportedly finally agreed to terms on “Phase One” of their trade deal, two months after it was initially reported to be agreed on.

Later is better than never, with the deal reported to call off the planned Dec. 15 tariffs and cut the Sept. 1 tariffs in half. While some details are still lacking and there is no guarantee of further progress, the worst case has been averted. Much like with the Fed, there appears a reduced chance of this issue forcing the U.S. into recession and influencing national and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings. construction. (Robert Calhoun is a managing director and senior economist and Matt Powers is associate director of market analytics for CoStar Market Analytics in New York City.)

For more information about Philly office space, Philly retail space, and Philly industrial space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

A Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, Wolf Commercial Real Estate provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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Are Retailers’ Earnings Reports Telling Us Something?

 “After seven consecutive quarters of comparable sales growth, we experienced a deceleration in our third-quarter sales,” – Macy’s CEO Jeff Gennette in a statement accompanying the retailer’s most recent earning release.

Retail has been the big story these past few weeks as many publicly traded companies reported earnings for the third quarter. The tone was … not positive.

Macy’s stock fell 11 percent during the week after reporting the first decline in sales in nearly two years. Home Depot dropped 8 percent after a sales miss. Kohl’s fell by 19 percent, missing significantly while also lowering its outlook. Urban Outfitters fell by 19 percent. Nordstrom fell 10 percent. Only the Target and the TJX Companies – owner of discounters TJ Maxx, Marshalls and HomeGoods – saw their shares rise after each reported a strong quarter.

It is well established by now that the U.S. economy – along with national and Philadelphia commercial real estate markets – are heavily dependent on the consumer, so how worried should we be about the red flags waving in these retail earnings reports? Is this what a strong consumer looks like? The story feels like it is about more than just shoppers shifting to online spending.

This CoStar Realty Information Inc. report from Robert Calhoun and Matt Powers involving U.S. and Philadelphia commercial properties is being made through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

Consumer spending in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – is ultimately built on the foundation of a strong labor market. While we continue to see job growth and low unemployment nationwide, cracks could be starting to show. We have seen job openings decline in recent weeks, and now it seems employers could also be actively laying off more workers. Weekly claims for unemployment insurance rose to 226,000 last week. While still very low from a historical standpoint, claims are up 15,000 in just two weeks.

Weakness in employment appears to be regional, focused largely on the Midwest and some scattered Northeast and Western states. However, the South remains the healthiest region. Every single state in what the U.S. Census Bureau defines as the South – except Maryland and Oklahoma – continues to see jobless claims fall. The economy in Oklahoma is much more heavily dependent on oil than other states (8 percent of employment versus only about 0.5 percent nationwide), so it has seen jobless claims rise as oil prices have declined from 2018 highs. And Maryland really isn’t even in the South, right?

This regional divergence in jobless claims seems largely driven by prolonged weakness in the manufacturing sector, on which Great Lake states are reliant. Manufacturing accounts for roughly 17 percent of that region’s gross domestic product compared to 11 percent in the U.S., including U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings.

It has been noted earlier that increased uncertainty causes a decline in business activity in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – as well as a decrease in hiring. It also typically signals a slowdown in firing, as decision-makers wait to see how events such as the trade war situation play out. Is this dynamic beginning to change in a worrisome way?

That is hard to say, but if it was, you would see it first in the areas of the country that are most at risk from the trade war, and it appears as if that could be happening.

Fortunately for the economy, the consumer isn’t the only game in town. Housing continues to buck the otherwise weakening trend in most areas of the U.S. economy, with more strong data out this past week, especially involving national and Philadelphia commercial real estate properties.

The National Association of Home Builders’ Housing Market Index posted one of its best figures since the last recession in its November report. The portions of the survey that asks homebuilders their thoughts on current sales, sales over the coming six months, and foot traffic of prospective buyers all have substantially improved in 2019.

Housing starts and permits also reported a leap in the Census Bureau’s October report. By “back-of-the-envelope” math, the rise in homebuilder sentiment and issuance pace of new permits is roughly equivalent to nearly a 1 percent boost to real GDP growth among national and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings. With no trade deal signed yet and wavering hiring indicators, that 1 percent becomes essential.

Meaningful regional divergence also can be seen in homebuilding activity: The Midwest is seeing declines in new building permits while the South leads the way on new construction. (Robert Calhoun is a managing director and senior economist and Matt Powers is associate director of market analytics for CoStar Market Analytics in New York City.)

For more information about Philly office space, Philly retail space, and Philly industrial space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

A Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, Wolf Commercial Real Estate provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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Big-Box Store Landlords See Signs Shoppers Still Spending

Some big-box store and mall owners in both national and Philadelphia commercial real estate markets are releasing sighs of relief: Consumers still are spending and could keep that up throughout the crucial holiday shopping season and into 2020, lifting any concerns of an immediate acceleration in store closings.

Peering into the earnings results of some the nation’s predominant big-box discounters like Target and TJ Maxx can offer a sense the economy and consumer confidence in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – will stay strong, at least for now.

That’s been a much-talked-about topic recently in U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings circles as investors awaited earnings reports they hoped would shed light on the current state of an industry evolving quickly to balance in-store and e-commerce sales as well as its brick-and-mortar footprint.

This CoStar Realty Information Inc. report from Jennifer Waters involving U.S. and Philadelphia commercial properties is being made through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

Store closings across the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – have been at a record pace, causing owners, investors and lenders to watch retail earnings reports closely to see if any slowing demand could mean more closings and empty store property on their hands.

Even with results that fell short of some of Wall Street’s expectations, retailers repeated the same song: the economy is still ticking away, and consumers still are in good shape. Of course, many of these retailers in national and Philadelphia commercial real estate properties remain focused on keeping their costs low, which can help lure shoppers into stores. The harder test is faced by the department stores that offer more expensive items and are reporting earnings results later this week.

But for the lower-cost sellers, the healthy results came despite the Commerce Department’s October sales report, which showed a reduction in spending tied mostly to vehicles and gasoline sales, two volatile segments. Skipping over those, spending rose, albeit at a speck of 0.1 percent, but analysts mostly have disregarded those factors as outliers.

Target, for example, exceeded earnings expectations with results that buttressed its strategy of providing consumers with unique items. The Minneapolis-based chain introduced new apparel brands, a proprietary grocery brand, and opened 25 mini Disney stores last month at competitive prices.

TJ Maxx, the parent of its namesake stores as well as Marshalls, Home Goods, and Home Sense in Canada, also reported robust results and plugged its forecasts. For TJ Maxx, for example, the wave of store closings has been a boon to the company’s business model of purchasing leftover inventory and selling it at reduced prices.

There are exceptions, such as J.C. Penney and Kohl’s, which are scrambling for ways to keep their brands relevant, according to analysts. While big-box and mall owners with national and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings continue to keep an eye on those retailers, they can rest assured that consumers are still opening wallets as job growth continues to keep unemployment at low levels. – By Jennifer Waters, CoStar Realty Information Inc.

For more information about Philly office space, Philly retail space, and Philly industrial space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

A Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, Wolf Commercial Real Estate provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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Common Commercial Leasing Mistakes

Common Commercial Leasing MistakesLet’s look at 10 common commercial leasing mistakes and how to avoid them. Commercial leasing transactions are among the longest term contracts parties will ever enter into, yet many often take the cavalier attitude that “it is just a lease.” That lack of focus and attention to detail often leads to mistakes that can haunt the parties for years and waste valuable time and money.

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Ten Common Commercial Leasing Mistakes and Suggested Tips:

1. Incorrect Names of the Parties
The parties’ names must be clearly and precisely listed but have errors a shocking number of times, as either the landlord’s name, the tenant’s name or both are often incorrect. These mistakes cast potential doubts regarding the validity and enforceability of the lease agreement and raise possible defenses. If you end up in such a situation, a lease amendment should be signed that expressly ratifies all of the lease terms and acknowledges the prior error(s). Avoid such situations by verifying the parties’ names by searching New Jersey and Pennsylvania corporate websites, which can be completed within a minute free of charge. Obtaining copies of filed certificates of incorporation, certifications of formation and the like will also help verify that the parties’ names are correctly shown. Further, a short form good standing certificate or a  subsistence certificate can be obtained online in a few minutes at a nominal cost.

2. Parties No Longer Exist
Entities to lease transactions (whether landlord or tenant or their successors or assigns) may be dissolved. Thus, the parties should conduct basic due diligence and verify the facts on an ongoing basis. Obtaining good standing or subsistence certificates could be helpful in this regard. If, for example, a good standing certificate indicates that annual reports and related fees are overdue, that party should be compelled to file such reports and pay such fees to avoid being involuntarily suspended by the State. If a party has already been dissolved voluntarily or involuntarily, they should be required to get their “organizational house” in order, and then lease instruments can be signed.

3. Your Lease is Actually a Sublease
Tenants should consider obtaining title searches to verify ownership of the property by the landlord indicated in the lease documents, or at the very least by asking for copies of deeds, tax records and title polices from their landlords. Otherwise, a tenant may not know that its lease is actually a sublease, which is more common than one might think. If you are a subtenant and not a tenant, your landlord cannot grant to you any rights that do not exist under the master lease and, therefore, you cannot understand your rights unless and until you review the applicable master lease.

4. Authorized Parties Do Not Sign or Incorrectly State their Title
Only an individual authorized to bind an entity should be signing documents on its behalf, and the signer’s name and title should be clearly shown. Such basics are commonly disregarded and the parties simply assume that whoever has signed the lease is an authorized signer. You should consider requesting copies of Operating Agreements, Shareholder’s Agreements and applicable consents and resolutions to confirm that an authorized person is signing. The lease documents should also explicitly represent that the person signing this lease document on behalf of each party is duly authorized to bind such party. If an agent is signing on behalf of the landlord, ask for evidence of authority in the form of a signed agency agreement granting such powers. Finally, make sure that the title of the signer matches the type of entity that is being bound. General partnerships have General Partners; limited partnerships have General Partners and Limited Partners; corporations have officers (i.e. typically President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer) and limited liability companies most commonly have Managers or Managing Members.

5. Premises Size Not Indicated
The size of the premises should be indicated, especially when the lease document indicates a rental rate on a square foot basis or requires pass throughs based on a proportionate share of the building or center.

6. Blanks in the Documents
Do not leave any blanks in the documents. Aside from simply looking sloppy, such blanks may be crucial in terms of triggering contractual milestones (e.g. lease commencement date, rent commencement date, timing to complete landlord’s work and the timing for the tenant to submit plans and to open for business). In a worst case scenario, document blanks could give rise to questions and disagreements regarding enforceability.

7. Lender and Other Required Approvals Were Not Obtained
Landlord’s loan documents may require lender’s approval prior to entering into any lease or lease amendments, and it is easy to forget to obtain such approval. Landlords should reach out to their lender(s) as soon as the lease is agreed upon so that the deal does not get derailed by delays. Tenants should ask for evidence of such lender approvals and representations that all required third party approvals have been obtained (or are not necessary). The parties should also check for rights of first refusal (ROFR), rights of first offer (ROFO), use and building restrictions in leases granted to other tenants.

8. Unclear if Prior Tenant Parties and Guarantors Remain Liable After Assignment
Original tenant parties and guarantors often remain liable for lease obligations even after there has been an assignment of a lease, barring negotiated releases. However, such continuing liability is often unclear to the responsible parties, including tenants that sold their businesses. Lease assignment and consent documents should clarify the scope and extent of the parties’ liability.

9. Unexpected Zoning Board, Planning Board or Other Approvals
It is not uncommon for leasing parties to discover after signing that unanticipated approvals are needed (such as from the zoning board or planning board), which can delay occupancy by months or longer and result in significant expense. Signage and other approvals may also be necessary. Ideally, the parties would perform due diligence of the zoning code and obtain copies of prior approvals granted prior to entering into the lease, and then allocate their respective responsibilities, obligations and related costs between them.

10. Failure to Utilize Professionals
There is no such thing as a standard lease, and the parties must ensure that the documents being negotiated and signed reflect their mutual understandings. Landlords and tenants would be wise to utilize experienced and qualified professionals such as commercial real estate brokers with local knowledge to assist in the leasing process. They would also be prudent to choose an attorney with significant leasing experience, good judgment and a reputation for getting deals done.

CONCLUSION:

A leasing transaction is one of the longest term contracts most parties will ever sign, typically lasting five years or longer. Some landlords and tenants take the attitude that “it is just a lease” (and therefore not a big deal) and do not pay requisite attention to the key basics of any contract, and those basic deal terms are wrong in an astonishing number of deals. The most common commercial leasing mistakes, such as incorrectly naming the parties, leaving blanks that potentially impact the rent commencement date and other key milestones and incorrectly stating a signer’s title are shockingly common. Landlords and tenants should take their time to get the deal as reflected in the lease documents precisely right, and avoid common mistakes such as those listed above, the majority of which can be avoided without significant expense by simply paying attention to the details.

Kenneth M. Morgan is an experienced leasing attorney licensed in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

The contents of this article are for informational purposes only and none of these materials offered are, nor should be construed as, investment advice, legal advice or a legal opinion based on any specific facts or circumstances.

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Does Your Business Have Equipment Breakdown Insurance?

equipment breakdown insurance policiesLet’s take a look at equipment breakdown insurance. Companies need safe and working equipment to operate efficiently and generate revenue. In fact, some organizations rely exclusively on a few pieces of equipment to run their entire business. Following a breakdown, major losses can occur, and many organizations turn to equipment breakdown insurance (sometimes referred to as boiler and machinery insurance).

Breakdown coverage is a form of property insurance designed to protect a company’s mechanical, electrical and computer equipment from unexpected breakdowns. These policies are flexible, and help organizations recoup financial losses related to property damage, business interruption and spoilage. Read on to see examples of this coverage in action.

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Benefits of Equipment Breakdown Insurance

• Repair cost coverage — Following an breakdown, organizations may have to pay thousands just to get their business up and running again. Equipment breakdown insurance can help soften the blow, reimbursing organizations for the cost to repair or replace damaged equipment due to an accident.

• Expediting expenses — Repairing complex equipment in a hurry can be an expensive endeavor. Most equipment breakdown insurance policies cover any expenses needed to speed up the repair or replacement of damaged property, including the cost of temporary repairs.

• Protection against business interruptions — Virtually in all cases, an equipment failure disrupts a business. In some instances, these disruptions are quantifiable, leading to lost revenue and productivity. Equipment breakdown insurance covers some of these costs, including income lost as a result of a covered accident. What’s more, this protection is in effect until the equipment is repaired or replaced.

• Coverage for perishable goods — Following an equipment failure, food-related businesses experience some of the most direct losses. Food industry equipment is not only expensive to repair and replace, but businesses can lose thousands of dollars worth of product if a freezer or refrigerator fails. Thankfully, equipment breakdown insurance provides adequate protection and covers food spoilage, manufactured goods or other perishable items after a covered incident.

Claims Scenario: Give Me a Break

The company: A metal cutting company.

The challenge: Equipment failure is a broad risk—one that can affect organizations of all kinds. What’s more, equipment failure isn’t always the result of a specific catastrophe, and many events that lead to a breakdown are out of a company’s control. Recently, a power surge caused by a major storm destroyed two circuit boards at a metal cutting shop. This unexpected outage left the business without the necessary machinery to continue operations. Furthermore, in order to meet production deadlines, shop workers had to travel to the company’s sister location. Between the lost time, travel expenses and repair costs, the organization experienced $52,000 in losses—all from just one storm. Equipment breakdown insurance in action: Equipment outages and breakdowns are not generally covered under standard commercial insurance policies. Instead, organizations should acquire comprehensive breakdown insurance to cover the cost to repair or replace damaged equipment. In addition, the insurance reimburses companies for lost time, which can prove invaluable following a sudden outage.

Claims Scenario: Spoiler Alert

The company: A small, family-owned restaurant.

The challenge: A restaurant recently experienced major losses after several of their refrigerators stopped working. The restaurant depends on these appliances to deliver fresh food to their clients. After several attempts to fix the system, the restaurant had to close for the day and call for repair services. Not only did the restaurant have to pay over $1,000 in maintenance costs, they also lost about $18,000 worth of food products due to spoilage—a major hit for a small business. Insurance in action: Just one equipment failure can lead to multiple losses, including lost revenue from business interruptions and lost product from spoilage. Thankfully, breakdown insurance can protect against these risks. In fact, equipment breakdown insurance is one of the few ways restaurants and other food-related businesses can recoup losses from spoiled inventory. An outage of any kind could easily result in the inability to prepare, cook, serve and sell food. As such, organizations need to secure the right policy to ensure their business is protected before, during and after an breakdown.

Learn More About Equipment Breakdown Insurance

Problems with your equipment can be extremely risky if you are not properly insured. What’s more, standard property insurance policies do not guarantee cover for these types of losses. In these instances, breakdown insurance is invaluable, protecting you in the face of unforeseen damage or breakdowns. Consult Hardenbergh Insurance Group today to learn more about equipment breakdown insurance to combat costly, and often unpredictable, problems at your place of business. We have the commercial property expertise to help you mitigate your risks and protect your bottom line.

Brian Blaston Hardenbergh

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Lower Inflation Figures Reflect Slowing Rent Growth

Recently released October consumer inflation numbers indicate less upward pressure on prices throughout national and Philadelphia commercial real estate markets, largely driven by weaker growth in housing costs, including slowing rent growth. The weaker inflation report comes after the Federal Reserve has already cut interest rates three times this year, in part to boost inflation closer to its target.

The slowdown in rent growth reflected in these lower inflation figures in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – is consistent with the trend in CoStar data on apartment rents, which have decelerated to around 2.6 percent today from above 3 percent in recent quarters.

This CoStar Realty Information Inc. report from Robert Calhoun involving U.S. and Philadelphia commercial properties is being made through Philadelphia commercial real estate broker Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ data, the consumer price index, which measures the price Americans pay for consumer goods and services, increased 1.8 percent in October compared to a year earlier. A meaningful increase in energy services and gasoline prices affecting U.S. and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings drove the slight uptick from the 1.7 percent increase seen in the previous month.

The core consumer price index, which excludes volatile food and energy prices and is a better measure of underlying inflation pressure, slipped to 2.3 percent year over year, down from 2.4 percent in September. The resultant decline in the U.S. commercial real estate market – including Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space – was largely driven by housing-related costs.

The shelter costs among national and Philadelphia commercial real estate properties account for roughly one-third of the consumer price index and nearly half of the core index. While government figures show rent for primary residences growing at 3.7 percent from a year ago, month-over-month rent growth decelerated to just 0.1 percent. This is the slowest growth in more than eight years.

Goods inflation, excluding food and energy, slowed somewhat in October as well. Apparel prices were the primary cause. While they are very noisy, the month-over-month decline of -1.8 percent represents the third-largest drop in apparel prices since at least 1947.

Prices for goods may see upward pressure going forward because of higher tariffs on imports from China and a recent decline in the foreign exchange value of the U.S. dollar. Continued strength in the labor market and wages concerning national and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings should allow retailers to pass on much of the expected price increases through to consumers.

Households in the U.S. spend three times as much on services as on goods. Despite slowing shelter costs, services inflation rose slightly in October to 3 percent. The cost of medical care services has been rising dramatically in recent months and now stands 5.1 percent higher than a year ago. Unemployment among healthcare practitioners and technicians is currently just 1.1 percent, which could be pushing up the cost of such services.

This report is not likely to change the central bank’s current stance on interest rates, at least for now. Although inflation is not trending in the direction the Fed would like, the Federal Open Market Committee indicated at its meeting in October that it intends to hold interest rates steady as it monitors incoming data. (NOTE: Robert Calhoun is a managing director and senior economist for CoStar Market Analytics in New York City.)

For more information about Philly office space, Philly retail space, and Philly industrial space or other Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 215-799-6900 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in Philly office space, Philly retail space and Philly industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage and advisory firm, is a premier Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors and sellers.

A Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, Wolf Commercial Real Estate provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space with the Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for Philly office space, Philly retail space or Philly industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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Just What is Title Insurance Anyway

Just What is Title Insurance AnywayWhat is title insurance? Title insurance has been around for hundreds of years, yet most people still do not truly understand the what is title insurance, what is its purpose and what is it there for. You know you need it to buy or refinance a property. It can cost a lot depending on price of your property or loan amount. But what does title insurance really do for you and do you really need it?

You should always protect yourself by purchasing a title insurance policy. Title insurance is an agreement to indemnify against damage or loss from a defect in title as evidenced by a policy of title insurance to a specific parcel or real property.

Just What is Title Insurance Anyway (PDF Download) >>>

What is Title Insurance and How Does It Function?

There are two types of policies available: Owners Policy and Loan Policy. An owner’s policy insures an owner of any type of real property against loss by reason of those matters covered under the policy of insurance for as long as they own that property. A lender’s policy insures the lender has priority by way of a security instrument that protects them over claims that others may have in the property.

For example, let’s say you are looking to buy a property that has an old mortgage showing up on public records that was given to the current owner 20 years ago. Mr. Seller is saying it was paid off a long time ago. If you purchased your property without title insurance from that seller and the lender whose mortgage was still showing up on title comes knocking on your door for final payment because Mr. Seller lied, guess who will be losing their home to a potential foreclosure? YOU.

You see, with title insurance, we review the history of public records that include mortgages, judgments, liens, and other encumbrances that may affect your property after you purchase it. We minimize the risk by addressing all the potential issues that could become claims and eliminate them so that we can provide free and clear title to you, the buyer.

Title companies provide a number of services to all of the parties in a real estate transaction. Not only do they provide the final title policy which is the ultimate proof of insurance on the property, they also provide assurances that the transfer of title takes place in a timely manner and that the interest of the buyers and lenders are protected under the terms and conditions of the policy. One major responsibility of a title company is ensuring that all parties receive their funds efficiently and securely.

Title insurance is different from other lines of insurance that most people are familiar with (homeowners, car insurance, etc). These other types of insurances assume risks providing financial protection for losses that may arise from an unforeseen future event such as a fire, theft or accident. With title insurance, you pay a one-time premium at the time of closing, unlike the other types of insurance which are typically paid on an annual basis.

For more information on title insurance, please visit our website at: www.deedsearchers.com

Nicole Malcolm

 

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