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Tag Archives: Philadelphia


Cooling Off as the Delta Variant Strikes

Signs are mounting that economic conditions are softening, putting economic growth at risk of moderation. Several reports measuring consumer behavior, business activity, and the housing market released last week showed just that. Moreover, most of these reports reflect conditions in July, before COVID cases began to significantly rise and threaten households and businesses with new rounds of restrictions.

Consumers Pull Back

The highlight of the week came early with the release of July retail sales, which reported a 1.1% decline over the month, the third monthly decline this year. Consumers continue to shift spending away from durable goods that they stocked up on during the worst of the pandemic, such as cars, furniture, and home improvement products, to in-person services, many of which are not even included in retail sales numbers, such as spending at hotels, motels, travel agencies, entertainment venues, and salons. 

Sales at bars and restaurants, which are included in the report, rose for the fifth month in a row, climbing by 1.7% in July, and sales at gasoline stations were up by 2.4% as more people took to the road for summer travel. Spending at auto dealerships fell by 3.9% in July, at building materials stores by 1.2%, and at furniture and home furnishing stores by 0.6%. Clothing sales fell unexpectedly by 2.6% in July after ratcheting up in June in what was thought to be a sign of a return-to-office wardrobe refresh.

Later in the week, consumer sentiment figures in the University of Michigan’s Survey of Consumers declined to multi-year lows. Consumer confidence fell sharply to its lowest level since December 2011, mostly due to the spread of the delta variant and its potential to slow economic growth, while inflation fears were also growing. Consumers indicated weakening confidence in both current economic conditions and expectations.

*Article Courtesy of Costar 

For more information about New Jersey or Philadelphia health care space, New Jersey or Philadelphia industrial space, New Jersey or Philadelphia retail space, and New Jersey or Philadelphia office space or other New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 856-857-6300 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in both New Jersey and Philadelphia cannabis healthcare space, New Jersey and Philadelphia office space, New Jersey and Philadelphia retail space, and New Jersey and Philadelphia industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage, and advisory firm, is a premier New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors, and sellers.

A New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, Wolf Commercial Real Estate provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new New Jersey and Philadelphia office space, New Jersey and Philadelphia retail space, or New Jersey and Philadelphia industrial space with the New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in both Philadelphia and New Jersey commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia and New Jersey commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for New Jersey or Philadelphia office space, Philadelphia or New Jersey retail space, or New Jersey or Philadelphia industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey, Philadelphia, and New Jersey commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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WCRE SECOND QUARTER 2021 REPORT

WCRE SECOND QUARTER 2021 REPORT: SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY & PHILLY MARKETS FOCUS ON LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL

As the COVID-19 Threat Recedes, Good Economic News Helps Shore Up CRE 

WCRE SECOND QUARTER 2021 REPORTCommercial real estate brokerage WCRE reported in its analysis of the second quarter that the Southern New Jersey and Southeastern Pennsylvania markets are cautiously entering the post-pandemic recovery. Although there are still lingering issues, CRE seems to be rebounding along with the broader economy.

“Fundamentals are tracking in a positive direction, and while various challenges remain, conditions are in place that point to a return to pre-pandemic CRE performance,”

said Jason Wolf, founder and managing principal of WCRE.  There were approximately 233,544 square feet of new leases and renewals executed in the three counties surveyed (Burlington, Camden and Gloucester), and while this figure is not indicative of a rebound, it marks the return of net positive absorption. New tenant leases comprised approximately 123,358 square feet, or about 53% of all deals for the three counties. During the previous quarter, this figure was only 8% of the total.

Download Printable Report (PDF) >>>

Other office market highlights from the report:
• Overall vacancy in the market is now approximately 13.6 percent, virtually unchanged from the previous quarter, and holding steady two points higher than at this point last year. 

• The sales market picked up momentum, with 1,257,385 square feet actively on the market or under agreement.

• Average rents for Class A & B product remain unchanged, as they continue to show strong support in the range of $10.00-$15.00/sf NNN or $20.00-$25.00/sf gross for the deals completed during the quarter. These averages have hovered near this range for more than a year.

WCRE has expanded into southeastern Pennsylvania, and the firm’s quarterly reports now include a section on transactions, rates, and news from Philadelphia and the suburbs. Highlights from the second quarter in Pennsylvania include:

• The vacancy rate in Philadelphia’s office market ticked upward again in Q2, and now stands at 10.3%, after hovering near a 20-year low for months. Nearly 15% of the total office space in Philadelphia is listed for sale or lease.

• The industrial sector in Philadelphia remained the bright spot, buoyed by its integral role in the new types of commerce necessitated by the health and safety measures. The last year saw a staggering 9.9 million SF of net absorption and 10.1% rent growth.

• Retail remains the sector most responsive to market conditions, but it has also proved to be the most adaptable. Some essential categories of retail thrived by innovating at the point-of-sale. Average retail net absorption went into free fall during the pandemic, but for the 12 months just concluded, it is -991,000 square feet. While this is a large negative number, it indicates an improvement of several hundred square feet for Q2.

WCRE also reports on the Southern New Jersey retail market. Highlights from the retail section of the report include:

• The Consumer Confidence Index has been rising steadily since it turned around in February.

• Retail vacancy in Camden County jumped more than three points to 14.3 percent after posting a large increase in the middle of 2020. While average rents rose more than one dollar, in the range of $12.86/sf NNN.

• Burlington County retail vacancy dropped to 9.6 percent, an improvement of more than three quarters of a point. But it is still well above 7.6 percent, where it stood a year ago. Average rents increased slightly, to the range of $14.59/sf NNN.

• Gloucester County saw another quarterly increase, to 16.5 after increasing throughout last year, with average rents virtually unchanged in the range of $14.08/sf NNN.

The full report is available upon request.

 

About WCRE

WCRE is a full-service commercial real estate brokerage and advisory firm specializing in office, retail, medical, industrial and investment properties in Southern New Jersey and the Philadelphia region. We provide a complete range of real estate services to commercial property owners, companies, banks, commercial loan servicers, and investors seeking the highest quality of service, proven expertise, and a total commitment to client-focused relationships. Through our intensive focus on our clients’ business goals, our commitment to the community, and our highly personal approach to client service, WCRE is creating a new culture and a higher standard. We go well beyond helping with property transactions and serve as a strategic partner invested in your long term growth and success.

Learn more about WCRE online at www.wolfcre.com, on Twitter & Instagram @WCRE1, and on Facebook at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, LLC. Visit our blog pages at ww.southjerseyofficespace.com, www.southjerseyindustrialspace.comwww.southjerseymedicalspace.comwww.southjerseyretailspace.comwww.phillyofficespace.com,  www.phillyindustrialspace.comwww.phillymedicalspace.com and www.phillyretailspace.com

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Petco To Buy Full Veterinary Practices to Boost In-Store Hospital Business in Industry Property Shift

Petco now plans to acquire full veterinary practices with established customers and relocate them into its stores as the nation’s second-largest pet store chain expands its initial strategy of just hiring veterinarians, a move that could change the real estate patterns for the pet health industry at large.

Executives of the San Diego-based company told analysts the acquisition plan goes beyond recruiting individual veterinarians to its growing slate of in-store pet hospitals. The company expects by the end of August to complete the first in a series of purchases of veterinary practices nationwide, at terms expected to be “really attractive,” though the exact number of planned acquisitions is not yet determined.

“As we looked at the market, there are still many, many small one- and two-vet practices that typically don’t get consolidated,” Petco Chief Financial Officer Mike Nuzzo said during the company’s first-quarter earnings call.

“We like the idea of taking an existing vet practice and moving it into our pet care center hospital,” Nuzzo said. “You start with a mature vet hospital, and it gives you a way to accelerate the model.”

Petco and its competitors are seeking to capitalize on trends including rising pet adoptions and sales of pet care products, which accelerated during the pandemic lockdowns of the past year. U.S. consumers spent an estimated $99 billion on their pets in 2020, up from $95.7 billion in 2019 and $90.5 billion in 2018, according to the American Pet Products Association trade group.

Petco CEO Ron Coughlin said Petco this year plans to open 72 new in-store pet hospitals within its existing slate of more than 1,500 stores, up from its previous guidance of 70 for the year. Petco is ultimately looking to have the in-store care centers in at least 900 locations. They are currently established in 137 locations, including more than 40 that debuted during 2020.

Coughlin said the hospitals have been key to establishing customer loyalty, repeat visits and merchandise purchases made during clinic visits. Combined with other initiatives including growing use of third-party delivery services for some items, the hospitals helped Petco generate a company record $1.4 billion in sales during its first quarter ended May 1, up 27% from the year-earlier period.

The company posted net income of $7.6 million, compared with a net loss of $31.2 million in the year-earlier quarter.

Coughlin said another factor aiding sales is industry consolidation. For instance, the CEO said Petco probably gained sales from customers in U.S. regions previously served by Pennsylvania-based retailer Pet Valu, which announced in November that it was shutting down all of its 358 U.S. stores and warehouses.

On the flip side, Michigan-based retailer Pet Supplies Plus announced it plans to open 100 new locations this year, including 40 locations acquired from Pet Valu after its shutdown.

*Article Courtesy of CoStar

For more information about New Jersey or Philadelphia cannabis health care space, New Jersey or Philadelphia industrial space, New Jersey or Philadelphia retail space, and New Jersey or Philadelphia office space or other New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 856-857-6300 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in both New Jersey and Philadelphia cannabis healthcare space, New Jersey and Philadelphia office space, New Jersey and Philadelphia retail space, and New Jersey and Philadelphia industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage, and advisory firm, is a premier New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors, and sellers.

A New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, Wolf Commercial Real Estate provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new New Jersey and Philadelphia office space, New Jersey and Philadelphia retail space, or New Jersey and Philadelphia industrial space with the New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in both Philadelphia and New Jersey commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia and New Jersey commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for New Jersey or Philadelphia office space, Philadelphia or New Jersey retail space, or New Jersey or Philadelphia industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey, Philadelphia, and New Jersey commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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THE $5 BILLION DECADE: Even through the pandemic, University City remains a hotbed of development.

Throughout the pandemic, real estate development has ramped up in University City where in excess of $5 billion has been spent on construction projects over the past decade. 

Billions more are in the pipeline. 

Just about every local academic and medical institution has contributed to the development in University City, solidifying it as a hub of innovation and as a place for investment. Private developers such as Brandywine Realty Trust, Wexford Science & Technology, GMH Capital Partners, Radnor Property Group, and Southern Land Co. are among those participating in the boom and signaling to those outside the region to also bet on University City’s future. 

As a result, the neighborhood saw more national and international investors come on the scene in the past year than ever before. Examples include: 

    • Ventas Inc., a Chicago company, is financially involved with Wexford in the development of uCity Square and Drexel University’s new academic tower. Last fall, Ventas sold a stake in those projects to GIC, Singapore’s sovereign wealth fund. Ventas formed a joint venture with GIC that now owns part of four buildings under construction totaling 1.4 million square feet. The cost of the development of those four buildings is roughly $930 million. Under the terms, Ventas will own more than 50% and GIC will own a 45% stake.
    • Republic Properties Group, a Washington, D.C., real estate company, plans to develop a $190 million, 185,000-square-foot life sciences building on a parcel at 125 N. 32nd St.
    • Brandywine secured two partners — one an undisclosed global institutional investor — on the development of a $287 million project at Schuylkill Yards. The other investor is Gotham Organization, a New York real estate company.
    • Silverstein Properties Inc. and Cantor Fitzgerald have made a $56 million investment in the development of 3.0 University Place, a proposed 250,000-square-foot life sciences building at 4101 Market St.

WHERE IT’S HAPPENING
Below is a rundown of projects underway, proposed, or completed, according to University City District. Scroll over the locations on the map to see details on each project.

Map Legend
Academic Commercial Medical Public space
Residential/mixed-use

“It speaks to how well the market has performed and the prospects for continued growth. University City has arrived,” said John Grady, senior vice president at Wexford. “I think there’s always risk in any market but what we see here is based on strong fundamentals. It’s not a fad. Most research you see coming out of the pandemic indicates there is going to be more focus on life science research and development and more investment in academic and medical centers. People that look to invest in Boston or San Francisco for life sciences see Philadelphia is a world-class market that has room to grow. We do have to be aware that we’re not the only place in the country seeing this growth. We do have to be conscious that it will be a competitive landscape.” 

Wexford and its partners have real estate projects underway in University City totaling $750 million.

The University of Pennsylvania alone completed $300 million in projects over the last two years including a new dorm called New College House West, a 68,000-square-foot innovation center at 40th and Sansom streets called Tangen Hall, and a 68,400-square-foot academic research building at Wharton. That figure excludes Penn Medicine’s new $1.5 billion, 1.5-million-square-foot Pavilion, which was delayed for a few months because of the coronavirus and is set to open this year. 

Between 2006 and the end of 2022, Penn and Penn Medicine will have invested $6.8 billion in new construction or renovation including $1.2 billion spent by third-party entities Penn partnered with on development. 

“We’re looking at the next phase of Pennovation Works, updating the master plan, looking at new infrastructure investment and assets in ground lease development,” said Anne Papageorge, vice president for facilities and real estate services at Penn.  

The infusion of billions of dollars of investment is solidifying University City as an innovation powerhouse on the global stage and helping to establish an innovation district between the neighborhood and Center City.

For decades, innovation was concentrated in suburban corporate campuses, which gave rise to such places as Bell Labs in North Jersey and the Research Triangle in North Carolina. By the early 2000s, urban areas such as University City were emerging as innovation hubs. This coincided with the return of cities and urban living along with anchor institutions such as universities investing more in commercialization, licensing, and startup spaces. 

In May 2017, the Brookings Institution issued a 62-page report outlining several recommendations to better position Philadelphia as a center for innovation. 

The report, titled “Connect to Compete: How the University City-Center City innovation district can help Philadelphia excel globally and serve locally,” was a culmination of an 18-month study that began in the spring of 2015. It urged officials to do more to take advantage of anchor educational and health care institutions and to focus on establishing an innovation district between 17th and 43rd streets. Brookings describes these districts as “dense engines of economic activity where research-oriented anchor institutions, high-growth firms, and tech and creative startups exist within an amenity-rich residential and commercial area.”

University City and Center City had all of the ingredients to firmly establish such a district but the city wasn’t taking advantage of them in an organized, concerted effort. 

“But for all these strengths — perhaps because of these strengths — Philadelphia leaders have been missing a sense of collective urgency to determine the position the region should play in the global economy and to fully leverage the power of the innovation district’s institutional, corporate, and civic anchors to drive innovative firm and job growth,” the report said. “The lack of a cohesive vision exacts a severe opportunity cost that Philadelphia can ill afford to ignore.”

The report’s recommendations were taken to heart by the university, civic and corporate leaders. Penn, Drexel University, the Science Center, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and other institutions committed to University City, stretched its boundaries and moved forward with significant projects. 

In addition to its clean and safe mission, University City District mounted placemaking, a jobs program called the West Philadelphia Skills Initiative and other economic development efforts to improve the neighborhood for businesses, visitors, and residents. As University City undergoes more development, areas such as Baltimore Avenue have remained vibrant tree-lined corridors with eclectic restaurants and retailers. 

Over the years, Drexel, Penn, and Brandywine seized upon various opportunities presented when large pieces of underutilized real estate such as the Civic Center, U.S. Post Office at 30th Street, and former University City High School became available. The development by Brandywine of the Cira Centre campus and Schuylkill Yards, along with a westward shift of Center City, have also helped to knit Philadelphia’s academic hub with its financial district.

“It’s hard for people to remember what it was like,” said Alan Greenberger, vice president of real estate at Drexel. Greenberger spent years as Philadelphia’s deputy mayor for economic development, director of commerce, and executive director of the planning commission. 

“There was the giant gap between the heart of Drexel and Penn and Center City,” Greenberger said. “It’s hard for people who haven’t been around to realize how significant of a gap that was. It’s hard for them to picture how uninteresting [John F. Kennedy Boulevard] was and there were gigantic parking lots on 17th, 18th and 19th and people said JFK will never get developed. Here we are and it seemed so obvious. It’s not just dumb luck. It’s because of very smart investments that have been made.”

When the city, under Greenberger’s tutelage, began working on the Philadelphia 2035 comprehensive plan, Center City and University City were increasingly being discussed as a metropolitan center. Of the 700,000 jobs in the city, half are concentrated between those two sections, Greenberger said. 

For all of the progress that has been made, there’s more work to be done. The last 25 years laid the groundwork for innovation and the commercialization of that innovation so Philadelphia could seize upon its dominance in life sciences and the emerging cell-and-gene therapy industry, which have thrived during the pandemic.   

The next frontier is executing on Amtrak’s master plan for eventual development over the rail yards next to 30th Street Station. The ambitious plan involves creating 40 new acres of open space and the potential for 18 million square feet of new development with a mixed-use neighborhood as an anchor project on top of 88 acres of rail yards along the Schuylkill River. In all, an estimated $4.5 billion in real estate activity could be undertaken.

While the billions of dollars spent on new buildings portend economic development activity, that success could easily be overshadowed by the abundance of work that remains in the West Philadelphia neighborhoods surrounding the college campuses, medical institutions, and office buildings.   

“We still have so much potential for growth and expansion,” said John Fry, president of Drexel University. “Key to that is that it needs to be done in an inclusive way.”

For Fry, that means thinking of a plan that looks at the area toward Spring Garden Street Bridge, Powelton Village, Mantua, and areas up to the Philadelphia Zoo and marries the innovation district with the area’s designation as a Promise Zone and Promise Neighborhood. 

“As part of our work in West Philadelphia, this is the next big thing we need to think about,” Fry said. “We need to think about going into the neighborhoods not to develop but to create neighborhoods, not for students, but for those who live in them and want to live in them. The key to that is affordable housing. We can set the example for real equity and inclusion. We have generations worth of work there.

*Article courtesy of Philadelphia Business Journal

For more information about New Jersey or Philadelphia industrial space, New Jersey or Philadelphia retail space, and New Jersey or Philadelphia office space or other New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 856-857-6300 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in both New Jersey and Philadelphia office space, New Jersey and Philadelphia retail space, and New Jersey and Philadelphia industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage, and advisory firm, is a premier New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors, and sellers.

A New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, Wolf Commercial Real Estate provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new New Jersey and Philadelphia office space, New Jersey and Philadelphia retail space, or New Jersey and Philadelphia industrial space with the New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in both Philadelphia and New Jersey commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia and New Jersey commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for New Jersey or Philadelphia office space, Philadelphia or New Jersey retail space, or New Jersey or Philadelphia industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey, Philadelphia, and New Jersey commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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Brandywine Expects Return-to-Office Recovery To Take At Least Three Quarters

Brandywine Realty Trust is seeing a big comeback in leasing activity as more tenants contemplate returning to the office, but executives cautioned it could take several months until operations are back to normal.

More than a year into the pandemic, office landlords across the country are seeing more tenants start to return to their office space as the coronavirus vaccine rollout expands. However, as Brandywine’s portfolio shows, the return to office is likely to unfold in fits and starts over the coming months as companies evaluate their long-term real estate needs.

“We have to keep in mind that we are in the beginning phases of a transition in the return-to-work journey. … We believe it will take three quarters or so to fully play out,” said Jerry Sweeney, CEO of Philadelphia-based Brandywine, during an earnings call Thursday with investors.

Brandywine solely and jointly owns about 25 million square feet located mostly around Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., and is one of the largest office landlords in fast-growing Austin, Texas. It recently expanded into Maryland.

The office-focused real estate investment trust said physical tour activity from prospective tenants increased 40% in the first quarter and it had more than 1,500 virtual tours. The company’s overall pipeline of leasing activity jumped by 400,000 square feet in the first quarter, hitting about 1.2 million, with 165,000 square feet in advanced negotiations.

Most of the midsize to smaller tenants are leading the charge to get back to the office, Sweeney said. Many companies also are still determining how many employees may work from home permanently, he said.

“We are clearly seeing from the pipeline additions that the return-to-work movement will accelerate and the flight to higher-quality office buildings is increasingly clear,” Sweeney said. 

Among the tenants searching for space, there is a greater emphasis on health and safety. Tenants are increasingly favoring spaces with private offices, more air circulation, larger workstations, and smaller gathering areas versus one large central space, Sweeney said. Some tenants in Philadelphia even took more square footage to allow for a more spacious layout, he said. 

“Certainly more and more companies are seeing the value of having people together physically,” Sweeney said. In conversations with larger companies, he said some employees are pushing back on the idea of being remote-only workers and want some flexibility to switch between remote work and being in an office at a dedicated workstation.

Few Workers Want Full-Time Return

While data varies, a January survey of office workers from Slack found that only 17% of office-based workers want to return to the office full time, 20% want to work remotely full time and 63% want the flexibility of a hybrid model.

Overall in the first quarter, Brandywine signed 493,251 square feet of new leases and renewals, according to its earnings results. Its profits were down about 14% year over year to $6.77 million, while revenue dipped 16% to $120 million, according to its first-quarter earnings results. However, about 99% of its office tenants are paying rent despite mostly not being back at the office. Brandywine is expecting some deferred rent later this year.

Although there is still uncertainty about the timing of a full recovery, Brandywine is seeing noticeably more touring activity, with tenants in the Philadelphia market seeing the biggest jump and Austin ranking last in its portfolio for tour activity, Sweeney said.

Brandywine is moving forward with Block A and the first phase of Block F in its massive redevelopment of the IBM Broadmoor campus into a mixed-use district near The Domain in north Austin. (Brandywine)

In downtown Austin, Brandywine has substantially completed construction of the office tower at 405 Colorado St., Sweeney said. The 25-story tower has struggled with leasing in the pandemic, particularly after law firm DLA Piper abruptly dropped its lease commitment last year. 

The 206,000-square-foot tower has remained about 18% leased since at least October, according to Brandywine’s previous earnings and first-quarter supplemental earnings results. However, Sweeney said the firm has a letter of intent for a full floor that it hopes to finalize in the next 30 days.

“Activity is definitely picking up. We’ve had four new tours in the last week alone,” Sweeney said.

Elsewhere in Austin, at Brandywine’s proposed Broadmoor campus in north Austin across from The Domain, IBM has declined to renew its lease at Building 905, and Brandywine expects to demolish the structure as part of its redevelopment of the area into a 66-acre mixed-use development.

Brandywine plans to advance Block A and the first phase of Block F at the project, encompassing $360 million of development. That includes 613 apartments, with about 341 units to start at a cost of about $119 million by the third quarter, Sweeney said. Brandywine also wants to kick off Broadmoor with 350,000 square feet of office but plans to wait until a significant portion is preleased prior to starting construction. Brandywine is looking for a joint-venture partner to help develop the first phase of Broadmoor and expects to select one within the week, Sweeney said.

Philadelphia Life Science Space

In Philadelphia, Brandywine and its joint-venture partner started construction on the $287 million Schuylkill Yards West in March at 3025 JFK Blvd.That project is expected to include 326 apartment units, 100,000 square feet of life science space and 100,000 square feet of office and street retail.

Brandywine struck a deal last month with the Pennsylvania Biotechnology Center to create B.Labs, a life science incubator at Cira Centre directly adjacent to the Schuylkill Yards neighborhood in the University City section of Philadelphia. 

The initial 50,000-square-foot lab and research space is expected to open in the fourth quarter. Sweeney said Brandywine has a pipeline of leasing activity for 35% of the space in that project.

Discovery District in Maryland includes The Hotel at the University of Maryland on U.S. Route 1. (Robert Isacson/CoStar)

Last quarter, Brandywine expanded outside of its core markets into Maryland after it was selected by Terrapin Development Co. and the University of Maryland as the exclusive developer of a 5-acre mixed-use neighborhood within the University of Maryland’s Discovery District. 

Plans for the development include 550,000 square feet of research and life science space and about 200 to 250 multifamily units in several phases. Permitting and planning is underway with a target groundbreaking in the second half of 2022. 

Discovery District is a $2 billion, 150-acre research-focused campus located in College Park, Maryland.

*Article courtesy of Costar

For more information about New Jersey or Philadelphia industrial space, New Jersey or Philadelphia retail space, and New Jersey or Philadelphia office space or other New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 856-857-6300 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in both New Jersey and Philadelphia office space, New Jersey and Philadelphia retail space, and New Jersey and Philadelphia industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage, and advisory firm, is a premier New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors, and sellers.

A New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, Wolf Commercial Real Estate provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new New Jersey and Philadelphia office space, New Jersey and Philadelphia retail space, or New Jersey and Philadelphia industrial space with the New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in both Philadelphia and New Jersey commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia and New Jersey commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for New Jersey or Philadelphia office space, Philadelphia or New Jersey retail space, or New Jersey or Philadelphia industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey, Philadelphia, and New Jersey commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

 
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Nearly 10,000 Apartments Under Construction in Philadelphia, With More on the Way

The Durst Organization’s proposed 26-story, 360-unit apartment project along the Delaware River is among a series of multifamily developments going through the approval process in Philadelphia, underscoring the optimism residential developers have for the city in spite of the pandemic.

A new housing report by Center City District reveals that an area defined as Greater Center City had 9,400 residential units under construction as of the end of last year, which is a 39% increase compared with the 6,762 units under construction at the end of 2019. 

Post Brothers is tackling one of the largest multifamily projects currently under development as it continues to transform the Piazza in Philadelphia’s Northern Liberties neighborhood. When it bought the Piazza in 2017, the community had 500 apartments. Another 700 units is in development at a project called Piazza Terminal. 

Post Brothers also developed 280 units at the Poplar at Ninth and Poplar streets that is 25% leased. 

“Absorption has been incredible,” said Matt Pestronk of Post Brothers. “During the early part of Covid, the market was dead but, across the whole portfolio, we are more leased than we were and at higher rents.”

Post Brothers owns 3,000 units in Philadelphia, excluding apartments under development. Of those apartments, 95% are occupied. 

The strong absorption last year was likely helped by a reduction in the number of newly constructed apartments that hit the market. A total of just 1,126 new housing units were built in 2020, which was half of what was completed in 2019, according to CCD. The reduction incompletions last year can be attributed to a halt in construction activity from March through June as a result of state mandates early in the pandemic. 

Despite that lull, developers did not stop planning for the future, banking that any population declines driven by the pandemic will be temporary and may even increase as flexible working arrangements have led people to move to Philadelphia, which is more affordable compared with other cities. 

The sale last year of development parcels throughout the region, and particularly in Philadelphia, was the highest it has been in at least five years, according to Real Capital Analytics data. By the end of the third quarter, $417.7 million of these properties had traded throughout the region with more than half of that transacted amount — $282.4 million — coming in Philadelphia.

In 2020, even with the pandemic, the 3,842 permits issued stood as the third-highest over the last 30 years, according to CCD.

The surge in permitting activity was driven by a pending expiration of the 10-year tax abatement on new construction, which was scheduled to sunset at the end of December 2020 but was extended for another year. Historically low-interest rates were also a contributing factor. 

Proposed projects in the pipeline that have gone or will go before the Philadelphia’s Civic Design Review Committee this month alone involve 1,612 new units. Including the Durst project, the number swells to nearly 2,000 apartments in the works at the early part of this year. The proposals include: 

    • Newtrack Development Corp. seeking to build 200 residential units in a 185,266-square-foot building at 2300 Market St. The project is proposed to have 12,048 square feet of commercial space. 
    • Atapco Properties proposing 185 apartments in a 178,837-square-foot building at 4401 Ridge Ave. that will have 4,400 square feet of commercial space.
    • 801 Girard LLC planning 80 units in a 61,291-square-foot building at 801 E. Girard Ave.
    • Riverwards Group envisions two projects on East Somerset Street. The developer envisioned 145 units in a 148,936-square-foot building at 2151-58 Somerset and 390 units in a 380,959-square-foot building at 220-50 Somerset. 
    • Glen Mills Associates has plans for 139 units and 12,991 square feet of commercial space in a 133,897-square-foot building at 1810-34 E. Hagert St., which is also referred to as 1825 E. Boston St. 
    • Mosaic Development Partners proposes 83 units in a 79,040-square-foot building at 6134-46 Wayne Ave.
    • Ampere Capital Group plans 110 units in a 106,374-square-foot building at 1640-48 Hancock St.
    • Another 280 units in a 272,111-square-foot project at 119 S. 31 St., which is a property owned by Horizon Housing Inc.

The Durst Organization’s development will be its first along the Delaware River, where it has assembled a series of properties and was last year named developer of Penn’s Landing. The new building will rise on a 1.6-acre parcel located between Vine and Callowhill streets. As planned, it will include 10,000 square feet of retail and a third of the property will be dedicated as open space. 

*Article courtesy of Philadelphia Business Journal

For more information about New Jersey or Philadelphia industrial space, New Jersey or Philadelphia retail space, and New Jersey or Philadelphia office space or other New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 856-857-6300 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in both New Jersey and Philadelphia office space, New Jersey and Philadelphia retail space, and New Jersey and Philadelphia industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage, and advisory firm, is a premier New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors, and sellers.

A New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, Wolf Commercial Real Estate provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new New Jersey and Philadelphia office space, New Jersey and Philadelphia retail space, or New Jersey and Philadelphia industrial space with the New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in both Philadelphia and New Jersey commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia and New Jersey commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for New Jersey or Philadelphia office space, Philadelphia or New Jersey retail space, or New Jersey or Philadelphia industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey, Philadelphia, and New Jersey commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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WCRE FIRST QUARTER 2021 REPORT

WCRE FIRST QUARTER 2021 REPORT: SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY & PHILLY MARKETS DOWN DUE TO THE PANDEMIC, BUT NOT OUT

Good News on Public Health and the Economy Holds the Promise of Better Days Ahead for CRE

Commercial real estate brokerage WCRE reported in its analysis of the first quarter of the new year that the Southern New Jersey and Southeastern Pennsylvania markets may be through the worst of the downturn brought on a year ago by the pandemic. The widespread availability of effective COVID-19 vaccinations, coupled with large-scale financial relief from the federal government, may bring an optimistic note back to the market. For the moment, market performance on several indicators remains off.

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“CRE performance in the first quarter seems to be tracking with our lived experience. As expected, office vacancy is quite high, while demand for industrial space is surging,” said Jason Wolf, founder and managing principal of WCRE. “Market fundamentals are shaky, but there are pockets of strength and resiliency.”

There were approximately 555,988 square feet of new leases and renewals executed in the three counties surveyed (Burlington, Camden and Gloucester), which was more than double the previous quarter. New tenant leases comprised approximately 44,952 square feet, or only about 8% of all deals for the three counties.

Other office market highlights from the report:
• Overall vacancy in the market is now approximately 13.55 percent, virtually unchanged from the previous quarter, and an increase of two full points since Q2 last year.

• Unsurprisingly, office vacancy rates have risen throughout the region. At 11.2%, the rate is the highest it’s been since 2014.

• On the other end of pandemic-induced usage shifts, the already strong industrial vacancy rate improved to 5.4%.

• Average rents for Class A & B product remain unchanged, as they continue to show strong support in the range of $10.00-$15.00/sf NNN or $20.00-$25.00/sf gross for the deals completed during the quarter. These averages have hovered near this range for more than a year.

WCRE has expanded into southeastern Pennsylvania, and the firm’s quarterly reports now include a section on transactions, rates, and news from Philadelphia and the suburbs. Highlights from the first quarter in Pennsylvania include:

• The vacancy rate in Philadelphia’s office market rose another half a point, and now stands at 10.1 percent, after hovering near a 20-year low. Despite the pandemic fallout, the city is still seeing rent and occupancy levels ahead of other major markets.

• The industrial sector in Philadelphia remained the bright spot. The last year saw 4 million SF of net absorption and 7.8% rent growth.

• Retail remains the most responsive to market conditions and the most vulnerable sector. Infection prevention measures and other economic pressures have brought existing issues from before the pandemic into sharper relief. Average retail net absorption for 2020 was 1.8 million square feet, but for the 12 months just concluded, it is -1.4 million square feet. 

WCRE also reports on the Southern New Jersey retail market. Highlights from the retail section of the report include:

• The Consumer Confidence Index rose slightly in February, before rocketing to its highest level in a year in March.

• Retail vacancy in Camden County ticked up to 10.9 percent after posting a large increase in the middle of 2020. While average rents changed little, in the range of $11.76/sf NNN.

• Burlington County inched up to 10.4 percent, representing a small increase on top of the jump from 7.6 percent in Q3 2020. Average rents increased to the range of $14.39/sf NNN.

• Gloucester County saw the biggest jump, up to 15.9 after increasing throughout last year, with average rents up almost a full dollar per square foot in the range of $14.11/sf NNN.

The full report is available upon request.

About WCRE

WCRE is a full-service commercial real estate brokerage and advisory firm specializing in office, retail, medical, industrial and investment properties in Southern New Jersey and the Philadelphia region. We provide a complete range of real estate services to commercial property owners, companies, banks, commercial loan servicers, and investors seeking the highest quality of service, proven expertise, and a total commitment to client-focused relationships. Through our intensive focus on our clients’ business goals, our commitment to the community, and our highly personal approach to client service, WCRE is creating a new culture and a higher standard. We go well beyond helping with property transactions and serve as a strategic partner invested in your long term growth and success.

Learn more about WCRE online at www.wolfcre.com, on Twitter & Instagram @WCRE1, and on Facebook at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, LLC. Visit our blog pages at ww.southjerseyofficespace.com, www.southjerseyindustrialspace.comwww.southjerseymedicalspace.comwww.southjerseyretailspace.comwww.phillyofficespace.com,  www.phillyindustrialspace.comwww.phillymedicalspace.com and www.phillyretailspace.com

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Consumers Spent $900 Billion More Online in 2020. Here’s Who Will Keep the Biggest Gains

Consumers across the globe spent $900 billion more at online retailers in 2020 compared with the prior two-year trend, according to a report released Tuesday by the Mastercard Economics Institute. 

Shoppers are heading back to restaurants and returning to stores to buy clothes and shoes in person. Yet they will continue to stock their fridges and hunt for good deals online — a sticky habit developed during the Covid pandemic, according to the report.

Nearly every retailer’s online sales jumped as shoppers were stuck at home. As consumers picked up online purchases in the parking lot and got packages or takeout dropped at their doorsteps, e-commerce made up about $1 out of every $5 spent on retail globally. That’s an increase from about $1 out of every $7 spent in 2019, the report said.

In an interview on CNBC’s “Worldwide Exchange” with Frank Holland, Mastercard’s chief economist, Bricklin Dwyer, said about 20% to 30% of the $900 billion in additional digital spending will continue into 2021 and the next few years.

However, the long-term e-commerce gains will be uneven and will depend on what a retailer sells, how they adapted their business model and how consumers prefer to shop. For some merchandise, such as clothing, shoppers may prefer to go back to brick-and-mortar stores where they can try on an outfit before buying it. In certain retail categories, such as electronics, online purchases already drove a larger share of overall sales, so there was less room to grow.

Grocery and discount stores will see the most dramatic and lasting shift to e-commerce, according to the report. Discount stores include dollar stores, wholesale clubs, and other retailers that sell to customers at near-wholesale prices. Grocers will likely retain about 70% to 80% of the digital sales gains they saw during the peak of the pandemic and discount stores will hold onto about 40% to 50% of them, the report said.

For both sectors, online sales made up only a single-digit share of overall sales before the pandemic — creating an opportunity for more noticeable growth.

Clothing stores, restaurants, and sporting/toy stores saw the biggest initial spike during the pandemic, however, but only kept 10% to 20% of that peak in sales, according to the report.

Electronics and department stores had the highest penetration of online sales before the pandemic, with e-commerce making up about 55% to 60% and 40% to 50% of their total sales, respectively, according to Mastercard. For the two sectors, their expected permanent shift will be around 20% to 30% of their peak jumps.

Dwyer said grocers face unique hurdles — even as more consumers shop online for produce, meats, and other ingredients. Only about 10% of overall grocery spending is through e-commerce, he said.

“You have to trust someone else to pick your peaches,” he said. “You have to have trust for someone else to deliver your goods and still have them good when they arrive. So that really is some of those barriers that we’re crossing.”

 *Article courtesy of CNBC

For more information about New Jersey or Philadelphia industrial space, New Jersey or Philadelphia retail space, and New Jersey or Philadelphia office space or other New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties, please call 856-857-6300 to speak with Jason Wolf (jason.wolf@wolfcre.com) at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a leading New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker that specializes in both New Jersey and Philadelphia office space, New Jersey and Philadelphia retail space, and New Jersey and Philadelphia industrial space.

Wolf Commercial Real Estate, a full-service CORFAC International brokerage, and advisory firm, is a premier New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm that provides a full range of New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings and services, property management services, and marketing commercial offices, medical properties, industrial properties, land properties, retail buildings and other New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties for buyers, tenants, investors, and sellers.

A New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker with expertise in New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate listings, Wolf Commercial Real Estate provides unparalleled expertise in matching companies and individuals seeking new New Jersey and Philadelphia office space, New Jersey and Philadelphia retail space, or New Jersey and Philadelphia industrial space with the New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial properties that best meets their needs.

As experts in both Philadelphia and New Jersey commercial real estate listings and services, the team at our commercial real estate brokerage firm provides ongoing detailed information about Philadelphia and New Jersey commercial properties to our clients and prospects to help them achieve their real estate goals.  If you are looking for New Jersey or Philadelphia office space, Philadelphia or New Jersey retail space, or New Jersey or Philadelphia industrial space for sale or lease, Wolf Commercial Real Estate is the New Jersey and Philadelphia commercial real estate broker you need – a strategic partner who is fully invested in your long-term growth and success.

Please visit our websites for a full listing of South Jersey, Philadelphia, and New Jersey commercial properties for lease or sale through our Philadelphia commercial real estate brokerage firm.

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WCRE FOURTH QUARTER 2020 REPORT

WCRE FOURTH QUARTER 2020 REPORT: SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY & PHILLY CRE MARKETS REMAIN ON SHAKY GROUND AS PANDEMIC WEARS ON

Industrial was Strong, While Other Sectors Felt the Brunt of COVID’s Worsening Spread

Commercial real estate brokerage WCRE reported in its analysis of the fourth quarter of 2020 that the Southern New Jersey and Southeastern Pennsylvania markets took an expected downturn in many sectors due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. At the same time, restrictions and infection control measures helped build strength in the industrial market, and there is sufficient momentum in the overall economy that the downturn is expected to be temporary. 

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“Commercial real estate is challenged by many of the conditions brought on by the pandemic, but the roll-out of the vaccines brings the hope of a return to normal activity sometime this year,” said Jason Wolf, founder and managing principal of WCRE. 

There were approximately 252,823 square feet of new leases and renewals executed in the three counties surveyed (Burlington, Camden and Gloucester), which was a drop of nearly 58% from the previous quarter. New tenant leases comprised approximately 64,450 square feet, or approximately 25.5% of all deals for the three counties surveyed.

Other office market highlights from the report:

• Overall vacancy in the market is now approximately 13.6 percent, which is a jump of about two-thirds of a point from the previous quarter, and an increase of two full points since Q2.

• Average rents for Class A & B product remain unchanged, as they continue to show strong support in the range of $10.00-$15.00/sf NNN or $20.00-$25.00/sf gross for the deals completed during the fourth quarter. These averages have hovered near this range for more than a year.

• Vacancy in Camden County increased to 15.2 percent for the quarter, but despite this slight increase, Camden County saw gradual improvement and prospect activity.

• Burlington County’s vacancy increased to 12 percent after dropping more than a point during the third quarter.

WCRE has expanded into southeastern Pennsylvania, and the firm’s quarterly reports now include a section on transactions, rates, and news from Philadelphia and the suburbs. Highlights from the fourth quarter in Pennsylvania include:

• The vacancy rate in Philadelphia’s office market rose another half a point, to 9.6 percent, after having hovered near a 20-year low. The pandemic has caused a large volume of office space to hit the market.

• The industrial sector in Philadelphia led the market, as it generally does. During Q4 vacancy rates ticked down to 5.1 percent, a slight improvement from the previous quarter. Net absorption for the year was 6.1 square feet. As the pandemic has led to a massive shift toward e-commerce, the industrial sector should remain quite strong.

• Retail CRE remains the most responsive and most vulnerable sector to market conditions. Ongoing coronavirus prevention measures have led to increased vacancy as businesses shutter. Average retail net absorption for 2020 was 1.8 million square feet. The vacancy rate is not expected to improve in the near term. 

WCRE also reports on the Southern New Jersey retail market. Highlights from the retail section of the report include:

• Retail vacancy in Camden County ticked up to 10.5 percent after posting a large increase from Q2 to Q3. While average rents changed little, in the range of $11.78/sf NNN.

• Retail vacancy in Burlington County jumped to 10 percent, up from 7.6 percent, with average rents increasing to the range of $14.14/sf NNN.

• Retail vacancy in Gloucester County went up again, to 13.7 increasing throughout the year, with average rents unchanged in the range of $13.14/sf NNN.

The full report is available upon request.

About WCRE

WCRE is a full-service commercial real estate brokerage and advisory firm specializing in office, retail, medical, industrial and investment properties in Southern New Jersey and the Philadelphia region. We provide a complete range of real estate services to commercial property owners, companies, banks, commercial loan servicers, and investors seeking the highest quality of service, proven expertise, and a total commitment to client-focused relationships. Through our intensive focus on our clients’ business goals, our commitment to the community, and our highly personal approach to client service, WCRE is creating a new culture and a higher standard. We go well beyond helping with property transactions and serve as a strategic partner invested in your long term growth and success.

Learn more about WCRE online at www.wolfcre.com, on Twitter & Instagram @WCRE1, and on Facebook at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, LLC. Visit our blog pages at ww.southjerseyofficespace.com, www.southjerseyindustrialspace.com, www.southjerseymedicalspace.com, www.southjerseyretailspace.com, www.phillyofficespace.comwww.phillyindustrialspace.com, www.phillymedicalspace.com and www.phillyretailspace.com

# # #

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WCRE THIRD QUARTER 2020 REPORT

THE SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY & PHILLY CRE MARKETS HEAT UP QUICKER THAN EXPECTED AFTER PANDEMIC-FUELED CHALLENGES

Economic Recovery Lost Steam Through the Quarter, But Leasing Activity was Strong

WCRE THIRD QUARTER 2020 REPORTCommercial real estate brokerage WCRE reported in its analysis of the third quarter of 2020 that the Southern New Jersey and Southeastern Pennsylvania markets out-performed expectations tempered by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. While the crisis reverberated through the economy and daily life, quarterly CRE indicators throughout the region showed resiliency and even some cause for muted optimism.

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“Uncertainty is high, of course, and will remain high unfortunately, but an economy that seemed to be recovering delivered some good news in our markets,” said Jason Wolf, founder and managing principal of WCRE. 

There were approximately 596,873 square feet of new leases and renewals executed in the three counties surveyed (Burlington, Camden and Gloucester), which was more than double the total for the previous quarter. The jump was driven by Lockheed Martin’s four renewals totaling approximately 320,000 square feet. Even without those transactions, Q3 leasing was about equal to the total for Q2. New tenant leases comprised approximately 93,544 square feet, or approximately 16% of all deals for the three counties surveyed.

Other office market highlights from the report:

  • Overall vacancy in the market is now approximately 12.95 percent, which is a jump from the previous quarter’s 11.5 percent.
  • Average rents for Class A & B product remain unchanged, as they continue to show strong support in the range of $10.00-$15.00/sf NNN or $20.00-$25.00/sf gross for the deals completed during the third quarter.
  • These averages have hovered near this range for more than a year.
  • Vacancy in Camden County increased to 14.9 percent for the quarter.
  • Burlington County’s vacancy increased to 11 percent after dropping more than a point during the first quarter.

WCRE has expanded into southeastern Pennsylvania, and the firm’s quarterly reports now include a section on transactions, rates, and news from Philadelphia and the suburbs. Highlights from the third quarter in Pennsylvania include:

  • The vacancy rate in Philadelphia’s office market rose more than half a point, to 9.1 percent, after having hovered near a 20-year low and below the vacancy rates of comparable major cities at the onset of the pandemic.
  • The industrial sector in Philadelphia led the market, as it generally does. During Q3 vacancy rates ticked down to 5.3 percent, a slight drop from the previous quarter. Although net absorption turned negative for flex and specialized space, it increased by 167,035 square feet for logistics space.
  • As vulnerable as retail CRE may be due to unprecedented job loss and businesses temporarily shuttering and/or reducing capacity, the vacancy rate held steady at 5.1 percent, representing a very small increase over Q2. Net absorption returned to positive territory at 284,752 square feet for the quarter, but is at negative 1.2 million square feet over the last twelve months. 

WCRE also reports on the Southern New Jersey retail market. Highlights from the retail section of the report include:

  • Retail vacancy in Camden County jumped to 9.7 percent from 5.4 percent in Q2. While average rents fell by nearly a third to the range of $11.68/sf NNN.
  • Retail vacancy in Burlington County held steady at 7.6 percent, with average rents increasing to the range of $13.82/sf NNN.
  • Retail vacancy in Gloucester County ticked up half a point to 12.9 from after posting a major increase in Q1, with average rents down in the range of $13.13/sf NNN.

The full WCRE Q3 Market report is available upon request.

About WCRE

WCRE is a full-service commercial real estate brokerage and advisory firm specializing in office, retail, medical, industrial and investment properties in Southern New Jersey and the Philadelphia region. We provide a complete range of real estate services to commercial property owners, companies, banks, commercial loan servicers, and investors seeking the highest quality of service, proven expertise, and a total commitment to client-focused relationships. Through our intensive focus on our clients’ business goals, our commitment to the community, and our highly personal approach to client service, WCRE is creating a new culture and a higher standard. We go well beyond helping with property transactions and serve as a strategic partner invested in your long term growth and success.

Learn more about WCRE online at www.wolfcre.com, on Twitter & Instagram @WCRE1, and on Facebook at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, LLC. Visit our blog pages at www.southjerseyofficespace.comwww.southjerseyindustrialspace.comwww.southjerseymedicalspace.comwww.southjerseyretailspace.comwww.phillyofficespace.comwww.phillyindustrialspace.comwww.phillymedicalspace.com and www.phillyretailspace.com.

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WCRE SECOND QUARTER 2020 REPORT

UNDER SEVERE CORONAVIRUS RESTRICTIONS, THE SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY & PHILLY CRE MARKETS STILL OUTPERFORMED EXPECTATIONS

Despite Widespread Lockdowns, Closures, and Uncertainty, the Market Showed Strength

Commercial real estate brokerage WCRE reported in its analysis of the second quarter of 2020 that the Southern New Jersey and Southeastern Pennsylvania markets held their own amid the most uncertain quarter in recent history. The coronavirus pandemic has upended every aspect of life and deeply impacted the economy. Still, quarterly CRE performance indicators showed some positive news, even as the effects of the crisis began taking hold. Vacancy rates across every property type remained low, and the sales market stayed active.

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“In the face of global calamity, and under severe but necessary restrictions, the CRE market in our area showed strong fundamentals and resiliency,” said Jason Wolf, founder and managing principal of WCRE. “The performance was a mixed bag, but we saw sufficient reasons for optimism.” 

There were approximately 277,716 square feet of new leases and renewals executed in the three counties surveyed (Burlington, Camden and Gloucester), which was a drop of 26% from the previous quarter. New tenant leases comprised approximately 129,569 square feet, or approximately 46.7% of all deals for the three counties surveyed. To help compare Q2 2020 vs. Q2 2019, there were approximately 286,707 square feet of new leases and renewals executed during the same time period a year ago,

Other office market highlights from the report:

● Overall vacancy in the market is now approximately 11.5 percent, which is a slight uptick from the previous quarter, but still not far off from a 20-year low.

● Average rents for Class A & B product remain unchanged, as they continue to show strong support in the range of $10.00-$15.00/sf NNN or $20.00-$25.00/sf gross for the deals completed during the quarter. These averages have hovered near this range for more than a year.

● Vacancy in Camden County increased a full point to 12.6 percent for the quarter.

● Burlington County’s vacancy further dropped to 10.4 percent after dropping more than a point during the first quarter.

WCRE has expanded into southeastern Pennsylvania, and the firm’s quarterly reports now include a section on transactions, rates, and news from Philadelphia and the suburbs. Highlights from the second quarter in Pennsylvania include:

● The vacancy rate in Philadelphia’s office market dropped slightly to 8.5 percent. The office vacancy rate is still near a 20-year low, and below that of comparable major cities. 

● The industrial sector in Philadelphia remains very strong. Q2 saw vacancy rates at 5.5 percent, only slightly higher than the previous quarter. Net absorption dropped about 20 percent, to 4.3 million SF, which was still strong. Rent growth jumped again, to 5.3 percent. Rent growth for the past few quarters has far exceeded the long-term average of 1.7 percent.

● Retail may be most at risk from the crisis. Rising wages and low unemployment had been fueling retail spending, buoying the CRE market. But with unprecedented job loss and many businesses temporarily shuttered by stay-home orders, retail will bear the brunt. The vacancy rate inched up to 5.0 percent, while net absorption was negative 546,300 square feet over the last twelve months. These figures may well become more dire in Q2, as the true economic effects of the pandemic take hold.

WCRE also reports on the Southern New Jersey retail market. Highlights from the retail section of the report include:

● Retail vacancy in Camden County dropped to 5.4 percent from 6.2 percent in Q1. While average rents fell slightly to the range of $17.20/sf NNN.

● Retail vacancy in Burlington County dropped to 7.6 percent, with average rents in the range of $12.14/sf NNN.

● Retail vacancy in Gloucester County ticked down to 12.4 from after posting a major increase in Q1, with average rents in the range of $14.21/sf NNN.

The full report is available upon request.

About WCRE

WCRE is a full-service commercial real estate brokerage and advisory firm specializing in office, retail, medical, industrial and investment properties in Southern New Jersey and the Philadelphia region. We provide a complete range of real estate services to commercial property owners, companies, banks, commercial loan servicers, and investors seeking the highest quality of service, proven expertise, and a total commitment to client-focused relationships. Through our intensive focus on our clients’ business goals, our commitment to the community, and our highly personal approach to client service, WCRE is creating a new culture and a higher standard. We go well beyond helping with property transactions and serve as a strategic partner invested in your long term growth and success.

Learn more about WCRE online at www.wolfcre.com, on Twitter & Instagram @WCRE1, and on Facebook at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, LLC. Visit our blog pages at www.southjerseyofficespace.com, www.southjerseyindustrialspace.com, www.southjerseymedicalspace.com, www.southjerseyretailspace.com, www.phillyofficespace.com, www.phillyindustrialspace.com, www.phillymedicalspace.com and www.phillyretailspace.com.

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WCRE FIRST QUARTER 2020 REPORT

THE YEAR STARTED OFF ON A HIGH NOTE IN THE SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY & PHILLY CRE MARKETS, THEN COVID-19 CREATED CHAOS

Predictions for 2020 Had Been Bullish, But are Now a Great Unknown

Commercial real estate brokerage WCRE reported in its analysis of the first quarter of 2020 that the Southern New Jersey and Southeastern Pennsylvania markets continued their years-long strong performance at the outset of the new decade. But by March it was clear that, just as every other area of life would be disrupted by the Covid-19 pandemic, the CRE market would not be immune. The quarterly performance still showed positive news, but the effects of the crisis began taking hold during the last weeks of Q1, so the true impact hadn’t become fully apparent. Vacancy rates across every property type remain low, and, while rent increases have cooled somewhat, growth remained positive for the quarter. Even before the pandemic struck many feared there were signs that the decade-long expansion was nearing its end. But even as growth slowed down, the economy appeared to be moving forward at a fairly solid pace before the crisis.

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“Initially the assumption was that the worst of the coronavirus outbreak would directly impact the regions in Asia where it first was identified, and that the impact to the U.S. would come in the form of disruption of supply chains and slower economic growth abroad,”
said Jason Wolf, founder and managing principal of WCRE.

“While those shocks have happened, the rapid spread of the virus within the US and around the world has impacted the global economy, and those effects are still becoming apparent throughout our local and regional CRE markets.”

There were approximately 374,429 square feet of new leases and renewals executed in the three counties surveyed (Burlington, Camden and Gloucester), which was up more than 80 percent over the previous quarter. The sales market stayed active, with about 1.02 million square feet on the market or under agreement. Completed sales were up about ten percent over the previous quarter, at approximately 866,444 square feet trading hands.

New leasing activity accounted for approximately 47 percent of all deals for the three counties surveyed. Overall, gross leasing absorption for Q1 was in the range of 110,000 square feet, up about 25 percent over the fourth quarter.

Other office market highlights from the report:

● Overall vacancy in the market is now approximately 11.2 percent, which is significantly improved from the previous quarter, and still near a 20-year low.

● Average rents for Class A & B product continue to show strong support in the range of $10.00-$15.00/sf NNN or $20.00-$25.00/sf gross for the deals completed during the quarter. These averages have hovered near this range for more than a year.

● Vacancy in Camden County ticked down to 11.6 percent for the quarter, as prospecting activity improved.

● Burlington County’s vacancy dropped to 10.8 percent, more than a full point improvement over Q4.

WCRE has expanded into southeastern Pennsylvania, and the firm’s quarterly reports now include a section on transactions, rates, and news from Philadelphia and the suburbs. Highlights from the first quarter in Pennsylvania include:

● The vacancy rate in Philadelphia’s office market dropped slightly to 8.5 percent. The office vacancy rate is still near a 20-year low, and below that of comparable major cities.

● The industrial sector in Philadelphia remains very strong. Q1 saw vacancy rates at 5.5 percent, only slightly higher than the previous quarter. Net absorption dropped about 20 percent, to 4.3 million SF, which was still strong. Rent growth jumped again, to 5.3 percent. Rent growth for the past few quarters has far exceeded the long-term average of 1.7 percent.

● Retail may be most at risk from the crisis. Rising wages and low unemployment had been fueling retail spending, buoying the CRE market. But with unprecedented job loss and many businesses temporarily shuttered by stay-home orders, retail will bear the brunt. The vacancy rate inched up to 5.0 percent, while net absorption was negative 546,300 square feet over the last twelve months. These figures may well become more dire in Q2, as the true economic effects of the pandemic take hold.

WCRE also reports on the Southern New Jersey retail market. Highlights from the retail section of the report include:

● Retail vacancy in Camden County rose very slightly to 6.2 percent from 6.0 percent in Q4. While average rents rose to the range of $17.27/sf NNN.

● Retail vacancy in Burlington County ticked up a second consecutive quarter to 8.0 percent, with average rents in the range of $12.23/sf NNN.

● Retail vacancy in Gloucester County jumped a full point to 12.7 from 11.7 percent, with average rents in the range of $13.71/sf NNN.

The full report is available upon request.

About WCRE

WCRE is a full-service commercial real estate brokerage and advisory firm specializing in office, retail, medical, industrial and investment properties in Southern New Jersey and the Philadelphia region. We provide a complete range of real estate services to commercial property owners, companies, banks, commercial loan servicers, and investors seeking the highest quality of service, proven expertise, and a total commitment to client-focused relationships. Through our intensive focus on our clients’ business goals, our commitment to the community, and our highly personal approach to client service, WCRE is creating a new culture and a higher standard. We go well beyond helping with property transactions and serve as a strategic partner invested in your long term growth and success.

Learn more about WCRE online at www.wolfcre.com, on Twitter & Instagram @WCRE1, and on Facebook at Wolf Commercial Real Estate, LLC. Visit our blog pages at www.southjerseyofficespace.com, www.southjerseyindustrialspace.com, www.southjerseymedicalspace.com, www.southjerseyretailspace.com, www.phillyofficespace.com, www.phillyindustrialspace.com, www.phillymedicalspace.com and www.phillyretailspace.com.

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